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form letters/lease agreements

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by sammynick, Nov 9, 2005.

  1. sammynick

    sammynick
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    Guest

    I have just started using Access and was given the task to, somehow, create
    letters and leases in this program. They would like to be able to just bring
    up the "report" and print it with everything filled out.


    PLEASE HELP!!!!!
     
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  3. Allen Browne

    Allen Browne
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    Guest

    Open the Northwind sample database that installs with Access.

    Open the Invoice report. The Invoices query shows how to collect the data
    from the various tables, and the report then lays it out like a letter.

    --
    Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
    Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
    Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

    "sammynick" <sammynick@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:F7506374-8CC5-4DFA-96C7-BA528ACEA085@microsoft.com...
    >I have just started using Access and was given the task to, somehow, create
    > letters and leases in this program. They would like to be able to just
    > bring
    > up the "report" and print it with everything filled out.
     
  4. Sprinks

    Sprinks
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Hi, SammyNick.

    This forum is more able to assist you with specific questions, but in
    general, to get you started, you will store data in tables, inputted through
    forms. You can define reports for the letters and leases that will include
    both static text and fields from your tables.

    Access is a "relational" database, which means your data will be stored in
    several tables, which may have relationships between them, such as
    one-to-many or many-to-many. In designing which tables you'll need, think in
    terms of "Things" (tables) and "attributes of the thing" (Fields).

    Each table should have a unique identifier that unambiguously identifies
    each record in the table, known as the Primary Key. The simplest way primary
    key is an AutoNumber, for which Access will simply assign a unique value for
    each new record. The only fields that should be duplicated between tables
    are fields that correspond to another table's primary key, called a foreign
    key. For example, a Lease record below has two foreign keys--the PersonID
    that identifies which Person record holds the lease, and the PropertyID,
    which identifies which property is under lease.

    Obviously you will need the name of the property, the address and phone of
    the lessor, etc., when you print your report. To tie data from related
    tables together, you create a query that joins the tables by the primary
    key/foreign key combinations, and include the fields in the query that you
    wish to print. The reports will then be based on the query rather than a
    single table.

    For example, based on what you've given so far, you'll need something like:

    People (or Customers, or some other descriptor):
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    PersonID AutoNumber (Primary Key)
    FName Text
    LName Text
    Address Text
    City Text
    State Text
    Zip Text
    Phone Text
    Email Text
    ....other person-specific fields

    Properties
    ----------------------
    PropertyID AutoNumber (PK)
    PropertyName Text
    Address
    .....other property-specific fields

    Leases
    ------------------
    LeaseID AutoNumber (PK)
    LessorID Integer (Foreign Key to Persons)
    PropertyID Integer (Foreign Key to Properties)
    StartDate Date/Time
    ....other Lease-specific fields

    Producing most reports is relatively straight-forward. What's important
    first is to define your tables such that they are "normalized". Any good
    Access reference will cover Normalization, and a Google search will find many
    additional resources. Understanding this topic is in my opinion the most
    important step in developing a good application.

    Hope that helps.
    Sprinks



    "sammynick" wrote:

    > I have just started using Access and was given the task to, somehow, create
    > letters and leases in this program. They would like to be able to just bring
    > up the "report" and print it with everything filled out.
    >
    >
    > PLEASE HELP!!!!!
     
  5. sammynick

    sammynick
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Thank you. I have started a basic db, but I guess I was getting to good at
    setting up reports. I was handed this assignment and I had NO idea even how
    to get started with it.

    "Sprinks" wrote:

    > Hi, SammyNick.
    >
    > This forum is more able to assist you with specific questions, but in
    > general, to get you started, you will store data in tables, inputted through
    > forms. You can define reports for the letters and leases that will include
    > both static text and fields from your tables.
    >
    > Access is a "relational" database, which means your data will be stored in
    > several tables, which may have relationships between them, such as
    > one-to-many or many-to-many. In designing which tables you'll need, think in
    > terms of "Things" (tables) and "attributes of the thing" (Fields).
    >
    > Each table should have a unique identifier that unambiguously identifies
    > each record in the table, known as the Primary Key. The simplest way primary
    > key is an AutoNumber, for which Access will simply assign a unique value for
    > each new record. The only fields that should be duplicated between tables
    > are fields that correspond to another table's primary key, called a foreign
    > key. For example, a Lease record below has two foreign keys--the PersonID
    > that identifies which Person record holds the lease, and the PropertyID,
    > which identifies which property is under lease.
    >
    > Obviously you will need the name of the property, the address and phone of
    > the lessor, etc., when you print your report. To tie data from related
    > tables together, you create a query that joins the tables by the primary
    > key/foreign key combinations, and include the fields in the query that you
    > wish to print. The reports will then be based on the query rather than a
    > single table.
    >
    > For example, based on what you've given so far, you'll need something like:
    >
    > People (or Customers, or some other descriptor):
    > ----------------------------------------------------------
    > PersonID AutoNumber (Primary Key)
    > FName Text
    > LName Text
    > Address Text
    > City Text
    > State Text
    > Zip Text
    > Phone Text
    > Email Text
    > ...other person-specific fields
    >
    > Properties
    > ----------------------
    > PropertyID AutoNumber (PK)
    > PropertyName Text
    > Address
    > ....other property-specific fields
    >
    > Leases
    > ------------------
    > LeaseID AutoNumber (PK)
    > LessorID Integer (Foreign Key to Persons)
    > PropertyID Integer (Foreign Key to Properties)
    > StartDate Date/Time
    > ...other Lease-specific fields
    >
    > Producing most reports is relatively straight-forward. What's important
    > first is to define your tables such that they are "normalized". Any good
    > Access reference will cover Normalization, and a Google search will find many
    > additional resources. Understanding this topic is in my opinion the most
    > important step in developing a good application.
    >
    > Hope that helps.
    > Sprinks
    >
    >
    >
    > "sammynick" wrote:
    >
    > > I have just started using Access and was given the task to, somehow, create
    > > letters and leases in this program. They would like to be able to just bring
    > > up the "report" and print it with everything filled out.
    > >
    > >
    > > PLEASE HELP!!!!!
     
  6. Joseph Meehan

    Joseph Meehan
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    sammynick wrote:
    >I have just started using Access and was given the task to, somehow,
    > create letters and leases in this program. They would like to be
    > able to just bring up the "report" and print it with everything
    > filled out.
    >
    >
    > PLEASE HELP!!!!!


    There are two basic ways. You can use an Access report for what you
    want. This would normally be the easiest for the new user. However if you
    want to do some things to make it really pretty, then I suggest you do a
    mail merge to Word. Where Microsoft Word has a document with fields that
    are populated with data from Access. You can then have well formatted data
    that looks like it was custom printed. Things like the name "ABC Co." on
    one form and "The Amalgamated Union of Industrial Pipe Fitters of South
    Hightsville NY" will both look good.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
  7. Smartin

    Smartin
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    sammynick wrote:
    > Thank you. I have started a basic db, but I guess I was getting to good at
    > setting up reports. I was handed this assignment and I had NO idea even how
    > to get started with it.
    >
    > "Sprinks" wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Hi, SammyNick.
    >>
    >>This forum is more able to assist you with specific questions, but in
    >>general, to get you started, you will store data in tables, inputted through
    >>forms. You can define reports for the letters and leases that will include
    >>both static text and fields from your tables.
    >>
    >>Access is a "relational" database, which means your data will be stored in
    >>several tables, which may have relationships between them, such as
    >>one-to-many or many-to-many. In designing which tables you'll need, think in
    >>terms of "Things" (tables) and "attributes of the thing" (Fields).
    >>
    >>Each table should have a unique identifier that unambiguously identifies
    >>each record in the table, known as the Primary Key. The simplest way primary
    >>key is an AutoNumber, for which Access will simply assign a unique value for
    >>each new record. The only fields that should be duplicated between tables
    >>are fields that correspond to another table's primary key, called a foreign
    >>key. For example, a Lease record below has two foreign keys--the PersonID
    >>that identifies which Person record holds the lease, and the PropertyID,
    >>which identifies which property is under lease.
    >>
    >>Obviously you will need the name of the property, the address and phone of
    >>the lessor, etc., when you print your report. To tie data from related
    >>tables together, you create a query that joins the tables by the primary
    >>key/foreign key combinations, and include the fields in the query that you
    >>wish to print. The reports will then be based on the query rather than a
    >>single table.
    >>
    >>For example, based on what you've given so far, you'll need something like:
    >>
    >>People (or Customers, or some other descriptor):
    >>----------------------------------------------------------
    >>PersonID AutoNumber (Primary Key)
    >>FName Text
    >>LName Text
    >>Address Text
    >>City Text
    >>State Text
    >>Zip Text
    >>Phone Text
    >>Email Text
    >>...other person-specific fields
    >>
    >>Properties
    >>----------------------
    >>PropertyID AutoNumber (PK)
    >>PropertyName Text
    >>Address
    >>....other property-specific fields
    >>
    >>Leases
    >>------------------
    >>LeaseID AutoNumber (PK)
    >>LessorID Integer (Foreign Key to Persons)
    >>PropertyID Integer (Foreign Key to Properties)
    >>StartDate Date/Time
    >>...other Lease-specific fields
    >>
    >>Producing most reports is relatively straight-forward. What's important
    >>first is to define your tables such that they are "normalized". Any good
    >>Access reference will cover Normalization, and a Google search will find many
    >>additional resources. Understanding this topic is in my opinion the most
    >>important step in developing a good application.
    >>
    >>Hope that helps.
    >>Sprinks
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>"sammynick" wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I have just started using Access and was given the task to, somehow, create
    >>>letters and leases in this program. They would like to be able to just bring
    >>>up the "report" and print it with everything filled out.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>PLEASE HELP!!!!!


    Sprinks has given great advice and a some fantastic examples to get you
    started.

    Speaking from the "been there" perspective I can proffer that while it
    may be tempting to jump in to building a database in the end you will be
    much better off if you understand basic concepts of "RDB design" and
    "normalization" first. Google up on these terms for plenty of
    information. This link may help:

    http://www.datamodel.org/NormalizationRules.html

    Good luck!
    --
    Smartin
     

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