Developing 'Mint Grade' Khalsa: From Birth, for a Lifetime

Discussion in 'Sikh Youth' started by Amarpal, Dec 9, 2004.


  1. Amarpal

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    Dear Khalsa Ji,

    With ‘The Sat’ willing, today I share with you my views on ‘Developing Mint Grade Khalsas’ based on my studies and learning in my life. What I know, I will share with you all in many small posts.

    1. Introduction:

    1.1. Definition:

    Mint Grade Khalsas’ are those Khalsas who are true to ‘The Sat’, true to the Gurbani, true to the Panth, true to their family, true to the society of the country in which they live, true to the humanity, true to the environment and true to the ecosystem in which we all live.

    They are ‘Mint Grade’ because they are pure; their scholarly brilliance in their chosen field makes them shine like gold. They are the role models.

    1.2 Opening statements:

    (a) Khalsa couples should keep in mind that babies are not accidents resulting from marriage but the intent of marriage. Once the baby comes into the family, the resources of the parents should be channeled for its healthy mental and physical growth.

    (b) Ever since the life came into existence on this planet, the mothers have been doing all that they could to feed, shelter and protect their young ones. Though many of our mothers, I will say parents, have crossed this line and evolved further, but still there are some who are still doing the same – science and art of developing capable Khalsas have not been mastered by some of them yet. The only change that has come is that they now use the new products that the technology has provided us to do what parents had been doing from ancient times. Mastering the science and art of developing ‘Mint Grade’ capable Khalsas is what the Panth should concentrate on.

    1.3 Our ancestral past:

    Some of the memories, tendencies and behaviors of our ancestors is still present in our memory. The evolution of brain from the early days of development of species on this planet has followed a golden rule: ‘do not alter any thing in the brain that works well’. That is why the stem part of our lower brain, which controls respiration, heartbeats and many such essential functions, is very similar to the early animals. The process of our developing into what we are today, evolution has progressively added more and more capabilities to our brain. This it did by adding layers on what was functioning well in the brain. This way of evolution has both good and bad effect in today’s life. The flight or flight response of our brain helps us to take quick decisions to survive, while instinctive emotional response some time creates problems. However by training our brain the way we want it to function we can retain the advantage and get over the problem. This is one of the areas where parents and the family can help the child a lot.

    1.4 Nature and nurture:


    The development and the capabilities of the brain are the result of two factors

    (a) Nature: This is what we receive from our parents through their genes. It expresses itself in our mental capabilities and tendencies. However some of the tendencies do not find expression in the absence of the needed environment, in other words, these tendencies can be controlled and even inhibited. For example: if an individual has inherited a gene from its parents, which has the potential to make her or him, addicted to alcohol and if this individual is born in the family which does not drink alcoholic beverages and this individual does not imbibe such drinks then this gene with not find expression. This way the environment can inhibit some of the tendencies that the child inherits from its parents.

    (b) Nurture: this is the learning and exposure, which we give to the child, both knowingly and unknowingly. By properly designing the child’s exposure, the parents and the family can help the child’s brain to get formatted in a way that give the child the potential for excellence in the fields which are natural to the child. Nurture can give the child the abilities it needs for vertical thinking, horizontal thinking, parallel thinking, individual and team working, creativity, ability to be focused and maintain concentration for long duration, becoming a self learner and to acquire very high intelligence quotient i.e. IQ and high emotional quotient i.e. EQ to mention few of them.

    1.5 The peer group:

    The peer group influences the development of the brain when the child joins it. Here the child learn to socialise, new traits start getting formed. It is my considered view that where the child has the option, it will select only those children to play with who have similar Samskaras and complementary traits as this alone can provide the individual to interface well with the group. In other words, the child’s early brain formatting at home alone create the conditions based on which the child selects the peer group. If the child gets into bad company, the parents and the family is responsible for it.

    With this, I close the first part of my posts on this topic. In the next post I will discuss the ‘Would be mothers’.

    With love and respect for all.

    Amarpal.

    These original thread inks are now merged as a single thread. spnadmin
     

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  2. Amarpal

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    Developing 'Mint Grade' Khalsas: Part 2: Would be Mothers

    Dear Khalsa Ji,

    With ‘The Sat’ willing, today I share with you my views on ‘Developing Mint Grade Khalsas’ based on my studies and learning in my life. What I know, I will share with you all in many small posts.

    In Part 1, I had shared my on certain general aspects viz.

    1. Introduction:
    1.1. Definition of Mint Grade Khalsas:
    1.2 Opening statements:
    1.3 Our ancestral past:
    1.4 Nature and nurture:
    1.5 The peer group:

    In this post I proceed further

    2 The would be mothers:

    We are all born to women. Women are the chosen ones by ‘The Sat’ to give us this form. Even, Guru Sahib in the very first sentence of Anand Sahib has address to his mother and informed her of his experiencing “The Sat’; this we recite daily during the Paath. This way Guru Sahib conveyed to us his preference.

    For my life in human form, according to my thinking, the first comes ‘The Sat’ and second my mother; then my father, family members and others follow them in the order of reverence.

    Before I share my learning pertaining to ‘would be mothers’, I pay my respect to our mothers (ladies who have children); all would be mothers (ladies who are in this process) and the potential mothers (all unmarried ladies and girls). I tell you all from the depth of my heart and soul that you all are blessed by ‘The Sat’ you create the future of the Panth, we in the Panth depend on you. You have lots to contribute.

    To all the members of the Panth I say that if our women are anaemic, the babies born to them will not be as strong as possibly they can be – mentally and physically. Subjugation and discrimination of women is contrary to the teachings of Sikhi; it is not good for Khalsa Panth; it is not good for our future. I am ashamed of the current sex ratio within our Khalsa population.

    More the Khalsas take care of their ladies stronger will be the Panth.

    With all this said, now I share with you all, my understanding on how the developing fetus gets influenced by the state of being of the would be mother.

    2.1 Mental state:

    We humans are very emotional beings. The brain, through hormones, controls emotional responses. Presence of hormones influences the functioning and development of many systems operating within human body. We all know the fetus draws nourishment for its growth from the blood in which the hormones are. These hormones influence the developing fetus too.

    The ‘would be mother’, for this reason, should always remain in normal and happy state from a period much ahead of the planned pregnancy, during pregnancy and after. It is the responsibility of the family to help create such conditions and that of the ‘would be mother’ to appreciate what is being done for her and not to be too demanding.

    2.2 Nourishment:

    The development of fetus is a very complex process. It is a great evolution. It is a wonder of nature.

    All the systems and parts of the body do not develop simultaneously; there is time a window when a particular organ or system of the body develops. Deficiency in nourishment at any stage of pregnancy will have an adverse effect on the organ that is suppose to develop during that time window of pregnancy. Fasting by ladies in general and by pregnant lady in particular, in some measure, is detrimental to the health of baby to be born. Providing healthy diet to our ladies is important for the Khalsa to be born and so for the Panth too.

    2.3 Physical work:

    Would be mother should engage herself in all the physical activities that her condition permits. Nothing should be forced on her and this would be mother should not avoid the work which she can do; keep in mind pregnancy is not a sickness. Physical work increases the blood circulation, which in turn is good for the baby developing in the womb; it helps remove the toxins and provide nourishment.

    It has been empirically established that other aspects being similar, would be mothers who had engaged themselves in physical work have higher probability of normal and easy delivery. Normal and ease delivery is good for their baby. The movement from the secure place and position in the womb to the outside world is an ordeal for the baby too. There are very few individuals, who remember this experience, I happen to be one of them. I can say from my personal experience; it is terribly scary; what this experience is I am not elaborating here. The only thing that I say here is that it is terribly scary. As is the case with all such scary experience this experience at the time of birth has the potential of influencing the emotional well being of the child. By doing reasonable physical work during the stage of pregnancy our ‘would be mothers’ can minimise the pain for themselves - in duration and intensity - and the ordeal for the babies, thereby minimise the impact of this ordeal on the emotional well beings of the babies.

    With this I close this part. ‘The Sat’ willing, next I will take up ‘The baby to be born’

    With love and respect for all.


    Amarpal
     
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  3. Neutral Singh

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    Sir, I am listening... please continue with this fascinating topic.

    Warm Regards
     

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  4. Neutral Singh

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    Amarpal Ji, all these abilities that you have mentioned above require individual attention. If you could elaborate more on these points... that would be immensely beneficail. Please do explain when you get time...

    Regards
     
  5. Amarpal

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    Dear Aman Ji,

    I have noted what you have said. I will soon come to each of these points separately.

    With love and respect for all.

    Amarpal
     
  6. Amarpal

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    Dear Aman Singh Ji,This morning in my post I had said that I will detail out on each of the topic where elaboration was said to be needed.

    I have since deliberated over the issues. The plain fact is what I can include in my posts is only a small introduction so as to direct the attentions of the Khalsas towards something specific and cannot do any thing more. I am also aware that the solution for any problem is child and parent specific, the field in which I simply cannot fuction through internet. The best way for me is to recommend some good books that will help you to learn all that I know. This way you will not only help your own family but also those around you.

    Please tell me if you want me to do so.

    Incidently I wish to share with you something that I have learnt: it has been established that in families where books are part of the furniture and parents have reading habits, TV or no TV, the children acquire reading habits.

    In my posts, over a period of time I will be introducing these subjects to our Sangat, this any way I am going to do, but it will take time and it will be general, not child specific.

    With love and respect to all.

    Amarpal
     
  7. Neutral Singh

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    Amarpal ji, reference to the books would be quite useful... please do provide these referencials books as you find suitable.

    Regards
     
  8. Amarpal

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    Developing 'Mint Grade' Khalsas: Part 3: The Baby to be Born

    Dear Khalsa Ji,

    With ‘The Sat’ willing, today I share with you my views on ‘Developing Mint Grade Khalsas’ based on my studies and learning in my life. What I know, I will share with you all in many small posts.

    In Part 1 and 2, I had shared my views on certain aspects viz.

    1. Introduction:
    1.1. Definition of Mint Grade Khalsas:
    1.2 Opening statements:
    1.3 Our ancestral past:
    1.4 Nature and nurture:
    1.5 The peer group:

    2 Would be mothers:

    2.1 Mental state:
    2.2 Nourishment:
    2.3 Physical work:

    Having shared with you this now I move to the next aspect.

    3 The baby to be born:

    In the womb the baby to be born is in a secure blissful state. This is the best condition for its development. How this state can be maintained, I elaborate below.

    3.1 The Brain:

    Before the baby comes into this world, it is already equipped with all the neurons in the brain it needs during its lifetime - about 100 billion neurons. Most of the neurons are not connected, some are. Most of the neurons connections are made after the birth based on its experience and learning from what the baby is exposed to. This gives the possibility to the parents to develop ‘Mint Grade Khalsas.

    3.2 Sense of hearing:

    Some of the mental faculties of the child are fully developed before the child experiences the out side world. Hearing is one such faculty; it is one of the Gyanindriyas. Inside the womb, after about 6 months, the child starts hearing all the sounds that reach it. The prominent among these sounds is mother’s heartbeats. The familiarity with this sound helps the mother to make the child feel secure in the outside world, which is totally new to the child. After the birth, when the child is disturbed, the mother picks it up, hold it close to her chest and gently pat it on the back. The thum thum thum ----- sound of the patting and its rhythm happens to be very close to the sound of mother’s heart beat that the child has been listening when it was in mother’s womb – a secure place. With this patting the child starts feeling the same sense of security as in the womb and becomes calm.

    This developed sense of hearing can be used to provide the link between the feeling of security inside the womb and the out side world which is new to the child and in a way fearsome to it.

    The mother can talk to the child who is still in the womb. The child, naturally, will not know what it means, but will be able to recognise the nature of sound – the tone, rhythm etc. This voice when heard again after the child is born will provide the child the continuity of experiences between its life in the womb and out side world and in some sense a familiarity with the outside world contributing to its sense of security.

    This is the time to develop in the ‘Baby to be Born’ a liking for classical music. It has been empirically established that those children who come from the families of musicians or where music is part of family life, they easily develop the skills needed for classical music – vocal or instrumental. These children have the edge because they are early starters in this field. It is important for Khalsa families to play classical music in the room where ‘Would be Mother’ spends long time. It is still better if this lady plays classical music on some instrument or singers herself. The foundation for the child’s love for classical music should be laid even before the baby is born. How this learning helps the child in its future development, I will explain in later parts of this series.

    It is needless to say that harsh sounds around the child are not very helpful for the development of mental capabilities of the child. All in the family should be sensitised on this and music or TV volume should be made low for this purpose.

    3.3 Sense of touch, smell, taste and sight:

    The senses of touch, smell, taste and sight are fully developed in the ‘Baby to be Born’. Unlike hearing, these senses are not yet trained by actual usage. The eyesight is not fully functional; the optical and neurological system is ready, but the muscle that are meant for focusing and for moving the eyeballs have not yet been exercised and so are not yet trained. This takes few days after the birth and the baby is able to focus and use the sense of sight fully.

    3.4 General environment:

    Human brain is not able to distinguish between the fiction and the reality. It behaves the same way when stimuli are received under these two different circumstances. For the brain it is only the stimulus that matters and not the source. That is why compassionate people start weeping when watching the films or TV serials showing intense suffering or injustice. This is not good for the health of the ‘Baby to be Born’. ‘Would be Mothers’ should avoid inflicting this emotional stress on themselves in the interest of their babies; the reasons for this statement I have already explained in my last post i.e. Part 2.

    With this I close this post.

    In the next I will share with you the next stage ‘The New Born Baby’

    With love and respect for all.



    Amarpal
     
  9. Prabjyot Kaur

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    Re: Developing 'Mint Grade' Khalsas: Part 3: The Baby to be Born

    Respected Amarpal Singh Virji,
    Waheguru Ji ka Khalsa Waheguru ji ki fateh

    It is very informative post on ‘Mint Grade’ Khalsa. I agree with all the suggestions that you have given for ‘would be’ mothers. It generally evolves what a family or mother should or should not do.


    Just wanted to ask you ‘what would you call it when during one pregnancy a mother cannot bear the violent scenes & hence her TV viewing diminishes automatically and it is not so in another pregnancy’. Similarly; ‘during one pregnancy she is so calm & spiritual and yet in another one everything around her frustrates her & she even forces herself to do Nitnem’. Isn’t it the ‘soul in the womb’ controlling mother’s behavior? Can a mother still hope to raise a ‘Khalsa’ child who from day 1 of conception was a difficult one?

    I enjoy your eloquent posts,
    Thank you,
     
  10. Amarpal

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    Re: Developing 'Mint Grade' Khalsas: Part 3: The Baby to be Born

    Dear Prabjot Kaur Ji,

    The difference in the mental make up you have refered to is because of the prevailing body chemistry. Harmones is the blood and neurotransmitters in the brain. This will definitely influence the child to be born.

    Knowing that we human are driven by the body chemistry, the individual can repeatedly tell itself that it is not normal, I should not get emotionally stressed, I should not feel stressed, I should be able to concentrate on Nitnem. The cortex of the brain will listen to these commands from you and if you have developed adequate linkage with it, it will initiate the counter measures to reduce the causes that makes the individual feels frustrated and irritated. It will no go away totally, but it will deminish; the extent will depend on the level of your own control over the mind. Our Guru Sahib had such a control over their mental faculties that he did not show any evidence of pain when he was made to sit on the hot plate with hot sand being poured over him.

    I hold the view that all this is science; the soul of the baby to be born is not controlling the behavior of the mother.

    The behavior of the mother is controlled by what she eats, what she thinks, what she does and how she is affected by the environment around her. It is also true that during pregnancy the length of the fuse is terribly short, small provocation can disturb her. This not her normal behavior; it is because of the body chemistry of the lady at that time. All who are around her should show due consideration to it; it is in the interest of the family.

    With love and respect for all.

    Amarpal
     
  11. Amarpal

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    Developing 'Mint Grade' Khalsas: Part 4: The New Born Baby

    Dear Khalsa Ji,

    With ‘The Sat’ willing, today I share with you my views on ‘Developing Mint Grade Khalsas’ based on my studies and learning in my life. What I know, I will share with you all in many small posts.

    In the last 3 posts were (i) Introduction; (ii) Would be Mother; and (iii) The Baby to be Born.

    In this post, I share with you my learning about the ‘New Born Baby’.

    4. The New Born Baby:

    As pointed out earlier, the baby’s travel from the cozy environment of the womb to the real world is scary and arduous. Fearful and sometimes starved of oxygen the ‘New Born Baby’ experiences our world; the family has the responsibility to soothe the discomfort and feelings of fear arising out of it. This can be achieved if the ‘New Born Baby’ does not receive any sustained dose of discomfort making its ordeal at the time of birth a matter of past.

    The networking of neurons in the brain now starts at a high speed based on what the ‘New Born Baby’ experiences. We human cannot directly control this networking, but can influence it indirectly. Designing an adequate environmental interface for this ‘New Born Baby’ is what is needed. The intent of the design of this interface is to make the ‘New Born Baby’ feel that nothing much has changed for it and things are fine. While designing this interface one has to depend on what the child is already familiar with. We also know that the ‘New Born Baby’ does not have the ability to analyse and goes only based on feelings that get generated based on the inputs it receives through its senses, this should be made use of to stabilise the ‘New Born Baby’. How to do this is elaborated below.

    4.1 Feeling of comfort - room temperature:

    The temperature, of the space in which the child is, should be almost the same, which the child had experienced in the womb. With this done, on this account the temperature, the ‘New Born Baby’ will not feel that things have changed for it. Room temperature is one factor that will instill feeling of security in the child.

    4.2 The sense of vision - room illumination:

    The baby’s world in the womb was not very bright. Whatever light reached that world was through the mother’s skin to which the baby was used to. The ‘New Born Baby’ has still to learn to adjust its eye muscles to adjust the aperture in the eye. For this reason the space in which the ‘New Born Baby’ is kept should not be too bright. It is good that during the initial period the ‘New Born Baby’ sleeps a lot so the brightness may not be very big problem, but it will be a good idea to have adjustable illumination for the initial period when the ‘New Born Baby’ gets introduced to its new environment. The illumination level can be progressively increased as the ‘New Born Baby’ learns to control the muscles that help in effective adjustment in the eye. The illumination level can be as much as the mother needs when the ‘New Born Baby’ is sleeping.

    4.3 The senses of touch, and smell:

    In the womb the child felt supported all over. In the world in which the ‘New Born Baby’ finds itself this feeling need to be given through make shift arrangements. The ‘New Born Baby’ should be wrapped with s soft clean cloth. Whenever the ‘New Born Baby’ is taken in hands, the whole body should be fully supported. This feeling of support the ‘New Born Baby’ gets from the sensors in its skin that sense the pressure resulting from the contact.

    The number of individuals that handle the ‘New Born Baby’ should be minimum as the ‘New Born Baby’ is not used to variety. Mostly it should be the mother who should handle the ‘New Born Baby’. This is useful for emotional bonding.

    The emotional relationship of the ‘New Born Baby’ with the mother starts with the bodily contact between the two while feeding the baby. The body odour of the mother plays an important role for the child to identify her. The discomfort resulting from hunger that the ‘New Born Baby’ experiences and its satiation get associate with this special feeling of touch and smell that the baby experiences. The ‘New Born Baby’ starts recognising the mother as the solution for its difficulties. This emotional relationship grows as the child learns more and more through its mother.

    Physical contact is very important for the feeling of security for the ‘New Born Baby’. Traditionally, in India, this contact is provided through the so call ‘oil massage’, which is given to the ‘New Born Baby’ almost every day. The resulting feeling of security allows all the systems of the body of the ‘New Born Baby’ to work at maximum effectiveness and the baby grows ay its maximum potential. It must be kept in mind that the contact through the cloth is not as comforting to the child as compare to the contact of bare skin. The contact where the child feels the body warmth of the mother is also very soothing to the child.

    All human contact with the ‘New Born Baby’ should be gentle and smooth. Rocking movements should be avoided for this initial period till the ‘New Born Baby’ starts feeling at home with its new world and develops confidence in those who handle it.

    4.4 The sense of hearing:

    As mentioned earlier, the baby in womb had been hearing all the sounds that reach it through the body of the mother. Prominent among these are mothers heartbeats and mothers voice. If in a noise free environment, the mother had been talking repeatedly the same thing to the baby in womb, then this tone and rhythm too becomes familiar for the baby to be born. The baby to be born also registers any soothing, soft music (Kirtan) that is played in absence of other audio disturbances. These are extremely important linkages of continuity in the life of the ‘Baby to be Born’ and the ‘New Born Baby’. These help the child to feel the same sense of security that it had felt while in the womb even when it is no longer in that cozy place. Their importance should not be underestimated.

    Mother should repeat the same words in the same tone and rhythm; the soft music (Kirtan) should be played at low volumes. Though the sounds as heard by the ‘New Born Baby’ will not be exactly the same that ‘Baby to be Born’ had heard that reached it thought mother’s body, yet the rhythm and the tone will by very similar to the lure the ‘New Born Baby’ into a sense of security. This is a very important interface that provides a real continuity.

    The ‘New Born Baby’ should not be exposed to loud or harsh sounds. They should be protected against the sound of crackers and blaring loud speakers.

    With this initial stablisation, the ‘New Born Baby’, having successfully established relationship with the new world, crosses the transition phase and becomes the ‘Learning Baby’.

    This post I close here.

    With love and respect for all.


    Amarpal Singh
     
  12. drkhalsa

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    Re: Developing 'Mint Grade' Khalsas: Part 3: The Baby to be Born

    Dear Khalsa ji

    Few months back I read a book regarding pregnancy it was from One of my friend working in paediatrics (child specialist) . It was really a nice book and it is really amazing that it also covers many things as Amarpal ji is telling us. Personally I liked the book very much I would recommend it more specifically to mothers in western culture because as book tells you many things it also gives scientific reason and explanations which make it more plausible to western rational mind setup


    The Secret Life of the Unborn Child
    Thomas Verny, MD, with John Kelly
    Synopsis ©1998 by Meryn G. Callander

    By creating a warm, emotionally enriching environment in utero, a woman can make a decisive difference in everything her child feels, hopes, dreams, thinks, and accomplishes throughout life.

    Verny is a pioneer in the field of pre- and perinatal psychology, a father, and psychiatrist in private practice. Here he presents a wealth of research indicating that the unborn child is a deeply sensitive individual who forms a powerful relationship with his or her parents--and the outside world--while still in the womb.

    While it is widely believed that the human fetus is a blank slate, lacking true sensation, emotional affect, or even the ability to feel pain, pregnant women through the ages have intuitively known what scientists have only recently discovered: that a mother's unborn child hears her voice and senses her love. The unborn child has significant sensory capabilities. He can see, hear, and feel.

    For example, by the fourth month after conception, the unborn child has a well-developed sense of touch and taste. He can perceive a bright light shining on the mother's abdomen; if the light is particularly bright, he will lift his hands to shield his eyes. At five months, he will react to a loud sound by raising his hands and covering his ears. The unborn has the capacity to perceive and remember sounds of speech, to recognize a story heard repeatedly in utero, and to recognize his own mother's voice. He has formed the brain structures necessary for learning, and even awareness, sometime between the 28th and 32nd weeks of development.

    Prenatal psychologists see the very core of human personality forming in the womb. Studies show that this personality formation takes place through intensive communication between parents--especially the mother--and the unborn. We know that most of what a mother eats, drinks or inhales is passed through her bloodstream into the body of her baby; maternal emotions are transmitted physiologically as well. Stress hormones travel through the mother's bloodstream to the fetus, inducing the same stressful state in the unborn child. Babies respond not only to a surge of adrenaline, but also to mother's behavior. When she pats her stomach, talks, sings, or dances, the unborn child knows that mother is actively there. Communication also occurs on the psychological plane, with baby responding to mother's deepest thoughts and feelings. This does not mean that every fleeting worry, doubt, or anxiety a woman has rebounds on her child. What matters are deep persistent patterns of feeling, such as chronic anxiety or a wrenching ambivalence about motherhood. On the other hand, thoughts infusing the baby with a sense of happiness or calm, set the stage for a balanced, happy, and serene disposition throughout life.
    Because a child is the product of an unhappy marriage or the baby of a cool, ambivalent, or even catastrophic mother does not necessarily mean he will develop an adult case of schizophrenia, alcoholism, promiscuity, or compulsiveness. Nothing about the mind is that neat. But the womb is the child's first world. How he experiences it, as friendly or hostile, does create personality and character predispositions.
    Verny also presents research indicating that the role of father is much more significant than generally accepted. His support is essential to the mother's--and thus, to their child's--wellbeing; what affects his sense of commitment to the marriage most deeply, is if and when he begins bonding with his child.

    Profound parental and environmental influences also occur during and immediately after birth. The newborn responds best to gentleness, softness, and a caring touch--as distinct from bright lights, electrical beeps and the cold, impersonal atmosphere often associated with a medical birth. All this means that a mother's ability to remain calm during her pregnancy, to communicate a sense of love to her unborn baby, and to orchestrate a joyous, positive birth, contributes immensely to the emotional and physical health of her child for the rest of his life.

    Fascinating research, replete with practical implications.
     
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  13. prakash.s.bagga

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    It is really surprising to note that the "Khalsaa " can be graded like this.
    The word Khalsa itself carries lot of meaning.Did we ever had any such system of grading of Khalsa advocated by Guru Gobind Singh ji.?
    I feel most of us may find the concept facinating but I feel differently.
    We should understand the essnce of the concept from within Gurbani too.
    These are my personal views only not intended to negate any bodys efforts.
    Prakash.s.Bagga
     
  14. Joginder Singh Foley

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    It is a good idea but all khalsa should be the best there is without being graded like hotels or judo enthusiasts as examples to their fellow Sikhs and to the rest of humanity as Sikhs/people who are honest/reliable/trustworthy who willbe there for you be you Sikh or non-Sikh without discrimination..Just this Singh's humble opinion on this

    :redturban:
     
    spnadmin and Tejwant Singh like this.
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