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Database password

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Marin, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. Marin

    Marin
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    Guest

    I use MSAccess 2003. I want to set database password.Can anyone tell me the
    max lenght of password and allowed symbols.

    Thanks in advance.
     
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  3. John Vinson

    John Vinson
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    Guest

    On Tue, 6 Jun 2006 23:45:02 -0700, Marin
    <Marin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >I use MSAccess 2003. I want to set database password.Can anyone tell me the
    >max lenght of password and allowed symbols.
    >
    >Thanks in advance.


    From the Help file:

    ===========
    Passwords are case-sensitive, so if you vary the capitalization when
    you assign the password, users must type the same capitalization when
    they enter the password.

    A password can contain any combination of letters, numerals, spaces,
    and symbols, and it can be up to 15 characters long. If you select
    advanced encryption options, you can make a password even longer.
    ===========

    Simple password protection is about as secure as a $8.95 bicycle lock.
    To quote the Help again:

    ===========
    If you use a database password, all users must enter that password
    before they are allowed to open the database. Adding a database
    password is an easy way to help prevent unwanted users from opening
    your database; however, once a database is open, no other security
    measures are provided unless user-level security has been defined as
    well.

    Microsoft Access stores the database password in an unencrypted form.
    If this will compromise the security of the password-protected
    database, you should not use a database password to protect the
    database. Instead, you should define user-level security to help
    control access to sensitive data in that database.
    ============

    If you want better security (at the price of a fair bit more work) use
    Access Security. Download the Security Whitepaper

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/207793/en-us

    It refers to 2000, but its contents still apply to 2002/3.



    John W. Vinson[MVP]
     
  4. Marin

    Marin
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Thanks John.

    "John Vinson" wrote:

    > On Tue, 6 Jun 2006 23:45:02 -0700, Marin
    > <Marin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    >
    > >I use MSAccess 2003. I want to set database password.Can anyone tell me the
    > >max lenght of password and allowed symbols.
    > >
    > >Thanks in advance.

    >
    > From the Help file:
    >
    > ===========
    > Passwords are case-sensitive, so if you vary the capitalization when
    > you assign the password, users must type the same capitalization when
    > they enter the password.
    >
    > A password can contain any combination of letters, numerals, spaces,
    > and symbols, and it can be up to 15 characters long. If you select
    > advanced encryption options, you can make a password even longer.
    > ===========
    >
    > Simple password protection is about as secure as a $8.95 bicycle lock.
    > To quote the Help again:
    >
    > ===========
    > If you use a database password, all users must enter that password
    > before they are allowed to open the database. Adding a database
    > password is an easy way to help prevent unwanted users from opening
    > your database; however, once a database is open, no other security
    > measures are provided unless user-level security has been defined as
    > well.
    >
    > Microsoft Access stores the database password in an unencrypted form.
    > If this will compromise the security of the password-protected
    > database, you should not use a database password to protect the
    > database. Instead, you should define user-level security to help
    > control access to sensitive data in that database.
    > ============
    >
    > If you want better security (at the price of a fair bit more work) use
    > Access Security. Download the Security Whitepaper
    >
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/207793/en-us
    >
    > It refers to 2000, but its contents still apply to 2002/3.
    >
    >
    >
    > John W. Vinson[MVP]
    >
     

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