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Database in partially converted state!!!

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Sharon L., Nov 10, 2005.

  1. Sharon L.

    Sharon L.
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    Guest

    For no reason apparent to me, when no one was using our Access 2003 database
    (but it was open on my desktop), I returned from a meeting to find an error
    message saying that the databse is in an unexpected state. "Has been
    converted from a prior version of Microsoft Access by using the DAO
    CompactDatabase method instad of the Convert Database command on the Tools
    menu. This has left the databse in a partially converted state. If you have a
    copy of the database in its original format, use the Convert Database command
    on the Tools menu to convert it. If the original is no longer available,
    create a new databse and import your tables and queries to preserve your
    data. Your other database objects can't be recovered."

    I have no idea what this means or why it happened. Any clues? The only
    additional info I have is that another user went to open it this morning and
    it was very slow to open, but it did open and he was able to eventually use
    it. I have a backup copy of my database from a few days ago that does not
    include data entry from the last two days-do I have to revert to that? My
    database has forms, reports, tables and queries - does the error message mean
    that I will lose the reports and forms?

    What is my next step? How do I prevent this in the future? I saw a previous
    thread alluding to this problem, but didn't understand the fE/BE stuff. I am
    a user, not a programmer.

    Any help is much appreciated!
    Sharon
     
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  3. Larry Linson

    Larry Linson
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    Guest

    First, if you had had already done the recommended split into Front End and
    Back End*, you would be in better position. If you have multiple users, each
    should have their own copy of the Front End. If it seems that distributing
    multiple FEs would be a lot of work, look at the Auto FE Updater at MVP Tony
    Toews' site, http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm. That site also contains
    the best collection of information and links about Access in a multiuser
    environment that I have seen

    Second, from the message, it appears likely that you will be able to recover
    the data. If you have a backup with the last design changes you made to
    Forms, Reports, Macros, Modules, and Queries (all of which should have been
    in the FE, and if that is what has been clobbered, you could just
    redistribute a copy of the Master), you should be able to reconstruct your
    DB... and, at the same time, invest the modest time and effort to split the
    DB for your own convenience and safety.

    Third, unless there is compelling reason, don't leave your production
    database open on your desktop while you are away. There's always a
    possibility that someone might idly press a wrong key and cause a problem.

    Fourth, it is possible that your database is corrupted due to some
    unidentifiable cause, and you will have to recover from your last backup.
    That will be an object lesson to schedule backups for an interval such that
    reentering the data since the backup will not be unduly burdensome.

    Fifth, once you have the split DB, you should also have a Development and a
    Production copy. Make your changes/enhancements to the Development copy and
    test them thoroughly before you use that to replace the Production copy that
    the users are using.

    NOTE: if you are the only user, just consider my use of the plural to apply
    equally to the singular.

    * A Front End is Forms, Reports, Macros, Modules, and Queries (and sometimes
    local lookup tables for rarely-changing items, such as States of the US,
    Divisions of your Company, etc.) linked to Tables in the Back End (residing
    in a shared folder, best on the server on your LAN, but can be on a
    workstation if you have a peer-to-peer network). You can use the Linked
    Tables Manager to maintain the links, if all users have retail Access
    installed; if not, you'll have to provide code to manage the links -- such
    code is available in some sample databases. Each user has their own copy of
    the Front End, residing on their own machine.

    The Back End contains Tables with data and Relationships... it does not
    contain Forms, Reports, Macros, Modules, and Queries that are a functional
    part of the production application, though it might contain some that are
    strictly used for DB maintenance. I try to be a "purist" and have nothing
    but Tables and Relationships in the Back End; others allow some maintenance
    items -- I would rather put the maintenance items in a separate Front End
    just used for maintenenace.

    Larry Linson
    Microsoft Access MVP

    "Sharon L." <Sharon L.@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:3DF41DA4-1076-4607-BD5A-FDACEC852C47@microsoft.com...
    > For no reason apparent to me, when no one was using our Access 2003
    > database
    > (but it was open on my desktop), I returned from a meeting to find an
    > error
    > message saying that the databse is in an unexpected state. "Has been
    > converted from a prior version of Microsoft Access by using the DAO
    > CompactDatabase method instad of the Convert Database command on the Tools
    > menu. This has left the databse in a partially converted state. If you
    > have a
    > copy of the database in its original format, use the Convert Database
    > command
    > on the Tools menu to convert it. If the original is no longer available,
    > create a new databse and import your tables and queries to preserve your
    > data. Your other database objects can't be recovered."
    >
    > I have no idea what this means or why it happened. Any clues? The only
    > additional info I have is that another user went to open it this morning
    > and
    > it was very slow to open, but it did open and he was able to eventually
    > use
    > it. I have a backup copy of my database from a few days ago that does not
    > include data entry from the last two days-do I have to revert to that? My
    > database has forms, reports, tables and queries - does the error message
    > mean
    > that I will lose the reports and forms?
    >
    > What is my next step? How do I prevent this in the future? I saw a
    > previous
    > thread alluding to this problem, but didn't understand the fE/BE stuff. I
    > am
    > a user, not a programmer.
    >
    > Any help is much appreciated!
    > Sharon
     

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