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Data Capacity of Access vs. Excel

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by CLamar, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. CLamar

    CLamar
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    Guest

    Does anyone know the storing capacity of Access and how it compares to Excel
    and other methods of storing data

    Thanks
    C.L.
     
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  3. Douglas J Steele

    Douglas J Steele
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    Guest

    An single Jet database file can be 2 GB. However, an Access front-end can
    connect to tables in virtually as many Jet database files as you have room
    for on your hard drive.

    There's really little point in comparing it to Excel, as they're intended
    for different purposes.

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele
    (no e-mails, please!)


    "CLamar" <CLamar@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:18609246-2608-4564-B82A-621EC71EF9DC@microsoft.com...
    > Does anyone know the storing capacity of Access and how it compares to

    Excel
    > and other methods of storing data
    >
    > Thanks
    > C.L.
     
  4. RB Smissaert

    RB Smissaert
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Excel sheets (that is where your data is stored) have 65536 rows and 256
    columns.
    The next version of Excel will have much more: 1048576 rows and 16384
    columns.
    Not sure when it is coming out.

    RBS

    "CLamar" <CLamar@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:18609246-2608-4564-B82A-621EC71EF9DC@microsoft.com...
    > Does anyone know the storing capacity of Access and how it compares to
    > Excel
    > and other methods of storing data
    >
    > Thanks
    > C.L.
     
  5. Larry G.

    Larry G.
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I asked this question several months ago and did some background research to
    verify the answers. If you want to know how big your ENTIRE database file can
    be the short answer is 2 Gigs.

    But the caveat to this is that depending on what you DO with your mdb file
    depends on how much data it can actually store. If you have just PURE data
    information, no reports, no queries, forms, macros, or anything else just
    tables holding data, the amount of data you can store is IMMENSE to say the
    least. Once you start cluttering up the mdb file with all that extra stuff,
    your capacity for pure data storage becomes comprimised. That is why a lot of
    the experts in this forum reccommend that you spilt your database into a
    front-end (where all the goodies are) and a back-end (where all the data
    lives) thus allowing you to creat an mdb file that has the potential to be 2G
    of pure data, and another file that has the potential to be 2G of goodies.
    Therefore you have an Access database that is 4G in size!

    Excel is a wonderful tool for handiling spreadsheet applications, it does
    not possess the capacity to generate reports, store and retrieve data the
    same way that Access does. As far as RAW data, each cell can contain 255
    Characters, there are 256 Columns, and 65,536 rows. Which means you can store
    4,278,190,080 charaters in Excel. Since each character is 8 bits you get
    34,225,520,640 bits of information which translates to roughly 4G of
    information.

    Now it is by FAR easier to control the flow of DATA in a tool that is
    designed to do so - Access. And FAR easier to control financial information
    in a tool that is designed to do so - Excel. So the question you should be
    asking yourself is this: What do I want this tool to do? Access has a
    capacity to manipulate data that Excel will never have. Most people are
    afraid to use Access simply because they do no know HOW to use it properly.
    --
    Never give up, the answer IS out there, it just takes a while to find it
    sometimes!


    "CLamar" wrote:

    > Does anyone know the storing capacity of Access and how it compares to Excel
    > and other methods of storing data
    >
    > Thanks
    > C.L.
     
  6. Immanuel Sibero

    Immanuel Sibero
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Good post.

    > least. Once you start cluttering up the mdb file with all that extra

    stuff,
    > your capacity for pure data storage becomes comprimised. That is why a lot

    of
    > the experts in this forum reccommend that you spilt your database into a
    > front-end (where all the goodies are) and a back-end (where all the data
    > lives) thus allowing you to creat an mdb file that has the potential to be

    2G
    > of pure data, and another file that has the potential to be 2G of goodies.
    > Therefore you have an Access database that is 4G in size!


    Well, you can have more than one BE, so practically the limit is your disk
    space. I dont know if there is a hard limit on how many Back Ends you can
    link to from an mdb, but you can certainly link to more than one.


    > 4,278,190,080 charaters in Excel. Since each character is 8 bits you get
    > 34,225,520,640 bits of information which translates to roughly 4G of
    > information.


    Unlike Access, Excel loads all data it works with into RAM at once. Unless
    you have a machine with more than 4GB of RAM, you wont be able to create or
    load a 4GB spreadsheet. This is not the case with Access.

    Access and Excel are complements of each other, they shouldnt be seen as an
    alternatives of one another. A person doesnt outgrow Excel and now is ready
    for Access. Distinctions between Access and Excel:

    - Access processes low level, nitty gritty detail of DATA, Excel processes
    high level, summarized INFORMATION.
    - Access is a DATA processor, Excel is an INFORMATION analyzer.
    - In many scenarios, Access outputs DATA which in turn is analyzed in Excel
    to produce meaningful INFORMATION. That's why they're complements not
    alternatives/substitutes.


    Immanuel Sibero





    "Larry G." <LarryG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:2256F733-141D-44B0-98D1-8646DC04D13F@microsoft.com...
    > I asked this question several months ago and did some background research

    to
    > verify the answers. If you want to know how big your ENTIRE database file

    can
    > be the short answer is 2 Gigs.
    >
    > But the caveat to this is that depending on what you DO with your mdb file
    > depends on how much data it can actually store. If you have just PURE data
    > information, no reports, no queries, forms, macros, or anything else just
    > tables holding data, the amount of data you can store is IMMENSE to say

    the
    > least. Once you start cluttering up the mdb file with all that extra

    stuff,
    > your capacity for pure data storage becomes comprimised. That is why a lot

    of
    > the experts in this forum reccommend that you spilt your database into a
    > front-end (where all the goodies are) and a back-end (where all the data
    > lives) thus allowing you to creat an mdb file that has the potential to be

    2G
    > of pure data, and another file that has the potential to be 2G of goodies.
    > Therefore you have an Access database that is 4G in size!
    >
    > Excel is a wonderful tool for handiling spreadsheet applications, it does
    > not possess the capacity to generate reports, store and retrieve data the
    > same way that Access does. As far as RAW data, each cell can contain 255
    > Characters, there are 256 Columns, and 65,536 rows. Which means you can

    store
    > 4,278,190,080 charaters in Excel. Since each character is 8 bits you get
    > 34,225,520,640 bits of information which translates to roughly 4G of
    > information.
    >
    > Now it is by FAR easier to control the flow of DATA in a tool that is
    > designed to do so - Access. And FAR easier to control financial

    information
    > in a tool that is designed to do so - Excel. So the question you should be
    > asking yourself is this: What do I want this tool to do? Access has a
    > capacity to manipulate data that Excel will never have. Most people are
    > afraid to use Access simply because they do no know HOW to use it

    properly.
    > --
    > Never give up, the answer IS out there, it just takes a while to find it
    > sometimes!
    >
    >
    > "CLamar" wrote:
    >
    > > Does anyone know the storing capacity of Access and how it compares to

    Excel
    > > and other methods of storing data
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > > C.L.
     
  7. CLamar

    CLamar
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Thanks

    "Immanuel Sibero" wrote:

    >
    > Good post.
    >
    > > least. Once you start cluttering up the mdb file with all that extra

    > stuff,
    > > your capacity for pure data storage becomes comprimised. That is why a lot

    > of
    > > the experts in this forum reccommend that you spilt your database into a
    > > front-end (where all the goodies are) and a back-end (where all the data
    > > lives) thus allowing you to creat an mdb file that has the potential to be

    > 2G
    > > of pure data, and another file that has the potential to be 2G of goodies.
    > > Therefore you have an Access database that is 4G in size!

    >
    > Well, you can have more than one BE, so practically the limit is your disk
    > space. I dont know if there is a hard limit on how many Back Ends you can
    > link to from an mdb, but you can certainly link to more than one.
    >
    >
    > > 4,278,190,080 charaters in Excel. Since each character is 8 bits you get
    > > 34,225,520,640 bits of information which translates to roughly 4G of
    > > information.

    >
    > Unlike Access, Excel loads all data it works with into RAM at once. Unless
    > you have a machine with more than 4GB of RAM, you wont be able to create or
    > load a 4GB spreadsheet. This is not the case with Access.
    >
    > Access and Excel are complements of each other, they shouldnt be seen as an
    > alternatives of one another. A person doesnt outgrow Excel and now is ready
    > for Access. Distinctions between Access and Excel:
    >
    > - Access processes low level, nitty gritty detail of DATA, Excel processes
    > high level, summarized INFORMATION.
    > - Access is a DATA processor, Excel is an INFORMATION analyzer.
    > - In many scenarios, Access outputs DATA which in turn is analyzed in Excel
    > to produce meaningful INFORMATION. That's why they're complements not
    > alternatives/substitutes.
    >
    >
    > Immanuel Sibero
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Larry G." <LarryG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:2256F733-141D-44B0-98D1-8646DC04D13F@microsoft.com...
    > > I asked this question several months ago and did some background research

    > to
    > > verify the answers. If you want to know how big your ENTIRE database file

    > can
    > > be the short answer is 2 Gigs.
    > >
    > > But the caveat to this is that depending on what you DO with your mdb file
    > > depends on how much data it can actually store. If you have just PURE data
    > > information, no reports, no queries, forms, macros, or anything else just
    > > tables holding data, the amount of data you can store is IMMENSE to say

    > the
    > > least. Once you start cluttering up the mdb file with all that extra

    > stuff,
    > > your capacity for pure data storage becomes comprimised. That is why a lot

    > of
    > > the experts in this forum reccommend that you spilt your database into a
    > > front-end (where all the goodies are) and a back-end (where all the data
    > > lives) thus allowing you to creat an mdb file that has the potential to be

    > 2G
    > > of pure data, and another file that has the potential to be 2G of goodies.
    > > Therefore you have an Access database that is 4G in size!
    > >
    > > Excel is a wonderful tool for handiling spreadsheet applications, it does
    > > not possess the capacity to generate reports, store and retrieve data the
    > > same way that Access does. As far as RAW data, each cell can contain 255
    > > Characters, there are 256 Columns, and 65,536 rows. Which means you can

    > store
    > > 4,278,190,080 charaters in Excel. Since each character is 8 bits you get
    > > 34,225,520,640 bits of information which translates to roughly 4G of
    > > information.
    > >
    > > Now it is by FAR easier to control the flow of DATA in a tool that is
    > > designed to do so - Access. And FAR easier to control financial

    > information
    > > in a tool that is designed to do so - Excel. So the question you should be
    > > asking yourself is this: What do I want this tool to do? Access has a
    > > capacity to manipulate data that Excel will never have. Most people are
    > > afraid to use Access simply because they do no know HOW to use it

    > properly.
    > > --
    > > Never give up, the answer IS out there, it just takes a while to find it
    > > sometimes!
    > >
    > >
    > > "CLamar" wrote:
    > >
    > > > Does anyone know the storing capacity of Access and how it compares to

    > Excel
    > > > and other methods of storing data
    > > >
    > > > Thanks
    > > > C.L.

    >
    >
    >
     

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