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creating a invoice

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by FOCUS101, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. FOCUS101

    FOCUS101
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    Guest

    i have 100 rows [clients] down and 25-30 colums [first name, last name, and
    basic info etc.] accross. I would like to create approx. 10 types of invoices
    which could apply to anywhere from only 1 to many clients. How do i create a
    report for this?
     
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  3. Rick B

    Rick B
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    Guest

    Your data structure describes one table that contains the customer data. I
    assume you also have a separate related table that includes the items
    purchased by the clients? And a separate table with all the possible
    products you sell? You only describe the client table to us, so it would be
    very hard for us to give you specific advice.

    To create an invoice, build a REPORT. Include the fields you want as
    controls in your report. Not sure why you would need more than one type of
    invoice, (you don't tell us what is different about the ten types) but you
    could either code your report to look different depending on the response to
    prompts, or the records selected, or you could create more than one report.
    For example, you might code the header or footer to display a past due
    notice only if there are past due items.

    Without a more specific question, I'm not sure we can give you much more
    advice. You might take a look at the Northwinds sample database that ships
    with Access. It has invoices and could be used as a template for your
    invoice.

    As you start working on this, feel free to post back with specific
    questions.



    --
    Rick B



    "FOCUS101" <FOCUS101@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:C29993C9-6C6F-436F-93CA-B045283E2A0A@microsoft.com...
    >i have 100 rows [clients] down and 25-30 colums [first name, last name, and
    > basic info etc.] accross. I would like to create approx. 10 types of
    > invoices
    > which could apply to anywhere from only 1 to many clients. How do i create
    > a
    > report for this?
     
  4. FOCUS101

    FOCUS101
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    this is for an insurance brokerage. i can create as many tables as you like.
    policy info on one table, and client info on another, etc etc. i just don't
    know how to work with this info to create an invoice going to the bank lets
    say or to a single client, etc. Your help would be great!

    "Rick B" wrote:

    > Your data structure describes one table that contains the customer data. I
    > assume you also have a separate related table that includes the items
    > purchased by the clients? And a separate table with all the possible
    > products you sell? You only describe the client table to us, so it would be
    > very hard for us to give you specific advice.
    >
    > To create an invoice, build a REPORT. Include the fields you want as
    > controls in your report. Not sure why you would need more than one type of
    > invoice, (you don't tell us what is different about the ten types) but you
    > could either code your report to look different depending on the response to
    > prompts, or the records selected, or you could create more than one report.
    > For example, you might code the header or footer to display a past due
    > notice only if there are past due items.
    >
    > Without a more specific question, I'm not sure we can give you much more
    > advice. You might take a look at the Northwinds sample database that ships
    > with Access. It has invoices and could be used as a template for your
    > invoice.
    >
    > As you start working on this, feel free to post back with specific
    > questions.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Rick B
    >
    >
    >
    > "FOCUS101" <FOCUS101@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:C29993C9-6C6F-436F-93CA-B045283E2A0A@microsoft.com...
    > >i have 100 rows [clients] down and 25-30 colums [first name, last name, and
    > > basic info etc.] accross. I would like to create approx. 10 types of
    > > invoices
    > > which could apply to anywhere from only 1 to many clients. How do i create
    > > a
    > > report for this?

    >
    >
    >
     
  5. Rick B

    Rick B
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Again, there are too many answers to this question. Can you ask us a
    specific question? What exactly are you having trouble doing?

    First, go build a report. Pull the fields you need into the report. Then,
    let us know what SPECIFIC issues you are running into.

    The wizard will help you design the report.

    The record source for your report will most likely end up being a query that
    pulls data from more than one table. You could create that query first and
    save it, or just build it while you design the report.

    Unfortunately, I just don't know what problem you are running into. I am
    not sure if you have tried to build the report, and it did not pull the data
    you wanted, or if it did not look like you wanted it to look, or what the
    issue is.

    Go give it a try, then come back with some details about why it is not
    meeting your needs.


    --
    Rick B



    "FOCUS101" <FOCUS101@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:CB2A007E-396F-4BF5-9917-DB596AABFF19@microsoft.com...
    > this is for an insurance brokerage. i can create as many tables as you
    > like.
    > policy info on one table, and client info on another, etc etc. i just
    > don't
    > know how to work with this info to create an invoice going to the bank
    > lets
    > say or to a single client, etc. Your help would be great!
    >
    > "Rick B" wrote:
    >
    >> Your data structure describes one table that contains the customer data.
    >> I
    >> assume you also have a separate related table that includes the items
    >> purchased by the clients? And a separate table with all the possible
    >> products you sell? You only describe the client table to us, so it would
    >> be
    >> very hard for us to give you specific advice.
    >>
    >> To create an invoice, build a REPORT. Include the fields you want as
    >> controls in your report. Not sure why you would need more than one type
    >> of
    >> invoice, (you don't tell us what is different about the ten types) but
    >> you
    >> could either code your report to look different depending on the response
    >> to
    >> prompts, or the records selected, or you could create more than one
    >> report.
    >> For example, you might code the header or footer to display a past due
    >> notice only if there are past due items.
    >>
    >> Without a more specific question, I'm not sure we can give you much more
    >> advice. You might take a look at the Northwinds sample database that
    >> ships
    >> with Access. It has invoices and could be used as a template for your
    >> invoice.
    >>
    >> As you start working on this, feel free to post back with specific
    >> questions.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Rick B
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "FOCUS101" <FOCUS101@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:C29993C9-6C6F-436F-93CA-B045283E2A0A@microsoft.com...
    >> >i have 100 rows [clients] down and 25-30 colums [first name, last name,
    >> >and
    >> > basic info etc.] accross. I would like to create approx. 10 types of
    >> > invoices
    >> > which could apply to anywhere from only 1 to many clients. How do i
    >> > create
    >> > a
    >> > report for this?

    >>
    >>
    >>
     
  6. Rick B

    Rick B
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I'm heading out, so perhaps someone else will jump in and help you out.

    --
    Rick B



    "FOCUS101" <FOCUS101@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:CB2A007E-396F-4BF5-9917-DB596AABFF19@microsoft.com...
    > this is for an insurance brokerage. i can create as many tables as you
    > like.
    > policy info on one table, and client info on another, etc etc. i just
    > don't
    > know how to work with this info to create an invoice going to the bank
    > lets
    > say or to a single client, etc. Your help would be great!
    >
    > "Rick B" wrote:
    >
    >> Your data structure describes one table that contains the customer data.
    >> I
    >> assume you also have a separate related table that includes the items
    >> purchased by the clients? And a separate table with all the possible
    >> products you sell? You only describe the client table to us, so it would
    >> be
    >> very hard for us to give you specific advice.
    >>
    >> To create an invoice, build a REPORT. Include the fields you want as
    >> controls in your report. Not sure why you would need more than one type
    >> of
    >> invoice, (you don't tell us what is different about the ten types) but
    >> you
    >> could either code your report to look different depending on the response
    >> to
    >> prompts, or the records selected, or you could create more than one
    >> report.
    >> For example, you might code the header or footer to display a past due
    >> notice only if there are past due items.
    >>
    >> Without a more specific question, I'm not sure we can give you much more
    >> advice. You might take a look at the Northwinds sample database that
    >> ships
    >> with Access. It has invoices and could be used as a template for your
    >> invoice.
    >>
    >> As you start working on this, feel free to post back with specific
    >> questions.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Rick B
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "FOCUS101" <FOCUS101@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:C29993C9-6C6F-436F-93CA-B045283E2A0A@microsoft.com...
    >> >i have 100 rows [clients] down and 25-30 colums [first name, last name,
    >> >and
    >> > basic info etc.] accross. I would like to create approx. 10 types of
    >> > invoices
    >> > which could apply to anywhere from only 1 to many clients. How do i
    >> > create
    >> > a
    >> > report for this?

    >>
    >>
    >>
     
  7. John Vinson

    John Vinson
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    On Thu, 18 May 2006 13:59:01 -0700, FOCUS101
    <FOCUS101@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >this is for an insurance brokerage. i can create as many tables as you like.
    >policy info on one table, and client info on another, etc etc. i just don't
    >know how to work with this info to create an invoice going to the bank lets
    >say or to a single client, etc. Your help would be great!


    What goes on an Invoice depends on your business rules. We don't know
    what your business is; we don't know what information you need to
    print on the invoice to meet your business rules; we don't know what
    information you collect.

    An Invoice is, just as Rick says, typically a piece of paper. The way
    you get Access to generate paper is by creating a Report, typically
    based on a Query pulling together information from one or more
    (usually more!) tables which contain the needed information.

    Your FIRST step is:

    STOP THINKING ABOUT INVOICES.

    Instead, identify the Entities - real-life people, things, or events -
    which are of importance to your application (clients, policies, etc.)

    For each Entity, identify its Attributes - atomic, non-repeating,
    discrete chunks of information about that type of entity (e.g. a
    People table might have fields FirstName, LastName, MiddleName, Title,
    ....) Each attribute of an Entity would be a field in your table.

    Once you have the Tables - *then* you can start thinking about Forms
    to enter the data, Queries to assemble the data, and Reports
    (including among others an Invoice report) to print the data.

    John W. Vinson[MVP]
     

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