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Cooking Without Alcohol

Discussion in 'Cooking & Recipies' started by findingmyway, Jun 16, 2013.

  1. findingmyway

    findingmyway
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    Have you had a recipe listing alcohol in the ingredients and wondered what you can use instead? Try some of these:
    http://homecooking.about.com/library/archive/blalcohol6.htm

    Alcohol Substitutions
    Alcoholic Ingredient
    Description Substitution
    Amaretto Italian almond-flavored liqueur Almond extract.
    Beer or ale Various types. For light beers, substitute chicken broth, ginger ale or white grape juice. For heavier beers, use a stronger beef, chicken or mushroom broth or stock. Non-alcoholic beers may also be substituted.
    Brandy
    Liquor made of distilled wine or fruit juice. Scotch or bourbon. If a particular flavor is specified, use the corresponding fruit juice, such as apple, apricot, cherry, peach, raspberry etc. or grape juice. Corresponding flavored extracts can be used for small amounts.
    Calvados
    Apple brandy Apple juice concentrate or juice.
    Chambord Black raspberry liqueur Raspberry juice, syrup or extract.
    Champagne Sparkling white wine. Sparkling white grape juice, ginger ale, white wine.
    Claret Light red wine or Bordeaux. Non-alcoholic wine, diluted currant or grape juice, cherry cider syrup.
    Cognac Aged, double-distilled wine or fermented fruit juice. Cognac is considered the finest brandy. Other less expensive brandies may be substituted, as well as Scotch or whiskey, or use peach, apricot or pear juice.
    Cointreau
    French, orange-flavored liqueur. Orange juice concentrate or regular orange juice that has been reduced (by boiling) to a thicker consistency.
    Curacao Liqueur made from bitter Seville oranges. Orange juice frozen concentrate or reduced fresh orange juice.
    Creme de Menthe Thick and syrupy, sweetened mint liqueur. Comes both clear and green. Mix spearmint extract or oil with a little water or grapefruit juice. Use a drop of food coloring if you need the green color.
    Framboise
    French raspberry liqueur. Raspberry juice or syrup. Depending upon the recipe, seedless raspberry jam may also be substituted.
    Frangelico
    Italian hazelnut liqueur. Hazelnut or almond extract.
    Galliano
    Golden Italian anise liqueur. Licorice extract.
    Grand Marnier French liqueur, orange-flavored. Orange juice frozen concentrate or reduced fresh orange juice.
    Grappa
    Italian grape brandy. Grape juice or reduced red wine.
    Grenadine
    Pomegranate syrup, sometimes alcoholic. Pomegranate syrup or juice.
    Hard Cider
    Fermented, alcoholic cider. Apple cider or juice.
    Kahlua
    Syrupy Mexican liqueur made with coffee and cocoa beans. Strong coffee or espresso with a touch of cocoa powder.
    Kirsch (Kirchwasser)
    Colorless liqueur made of cherries. Black cherry, raspberry, boysenberry, currant, or grape, juice or syrup, or cherry cider.
    Red Burgundy Dry French wine. Non-alcoholic wine, red wine vinegar, grape juice.
    Red wine
    Sweet or dry wine. Non-alcoholic wine, beef or chicken broth or stock, diluted red wine vinegar, red grape juice diluted with red wine vinegar or rice vinegar, tomato juice, liquid from canned mushrooms, plain water.
    Rum
    Liquor distilled from molasses or sugar syrup. For light rum, use pineapple juice flavored with almond extract. For dark rum, use molasses thinned with pineapple juice and flavored with almond extract. Or use rum extract flavoring.
    Sake
    Fermented rice drink. Rice vinegar.
    Schnapps
    Flavored, colorless liquor. Use corresponding flavored extract such as peppermint, peach, etc.
    Sherry Fortified dessert wine, sweet or dry, some with a slightly nutty flavor. Orange or pineapple juice.
    Southern Comfort
    Bourbon mixed with peach liqueur. Peach nectar mixed with a little cider vinegar.
    Tequila
    Liquor made of the agave plant. Cactus/agave nectar or juice.
    Triple Sec
    Orange-flavored liqueur. Orange juice frozen concentrate or reduced fresh orange juice.
    Vermouth
    Wine-based drink infused with herbs. I may be sweet or dry. For sweet vermouth, use non-alcoholic sweet wine, apple or grape juice or aged balsamic vinegar. For dry vermouth, use non-alcoholic white wine, white grape juice or white wine vinegar.
    Whiskey (whisky)
    Distilled liquor. Bourbon, Scotch and whiskey may be used interchangably. Small amounts may be eliminated. Large amounts cannot be effectively substituted.
    White Burgundy
    Dry French wine. Non-alcoholic wine, white grape juice diluted with white wine vinegar.
    White wine
    Sweet or dry wine. Non-alcoholic wine, chicken broth or stock, diluted white wine vinegar or cider vinegar, white grape juice diluted with white wine vinegar, ginger ale, canned mushroom liquid, water. For marinades, substitute 1/4 cup vinegar plus 1 Tablespoon sugar plus 1/4 cup water.
     
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    #1 findingmyway, Jun 16, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2013
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  3. Harry Haller

    Harry Haller United Kingdom
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    I don't think there is anything I would like to eat that contains the above anyway so Im safe! lol lol lol

    yes it can! simply pick up a couple of tramps and sit between then when you eat, whilst they play blow football!

    for different scotches, simply choose your tramps carefully, look for nationality give aways, Canadian tramps are very well spoken, Irish ones only drinky whisky, I suppose the holy grail is a japanese one
     
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    #2 Harry Haller, Jun 16, 2013
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  4. Tejwant Singh

    Tejwant Singh United States
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    The fact of the matter is that all the alcohol dissipates in the cooking process. Many a times the dishes containing alcohol are lit in the pans. Only the flavour/s of the ingredients in it are left if one has a great palate to sort them out, in one's mouth. I use alcohol in some dishes I cook. Well, not in a goblet though.

    Anyone for an Irish coffee??
     
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    #3 Tejwant Singh, Jun 17, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013
  5. Luckysingh

    Luckysingh Canada
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    I wonder if the above can also be used for 'virgin' cocktail substitutes ?
    Imagine my James Bond martini with white vinegar/ white grape juice - shaken but not stirred !!
     
  6. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Tejwant Singh ji

    Always there is a sticking point.. why be surprised? Somewhere here at SPN there is a thread that lists different ways of rendering off alcohol. It shows that depending on the method of cooking that all alcohol is not dissipated. Up to 25 percent can remain, if memory serves me correctly, even after marinating in alcohol for 24 hours and then preparing food over high direct heat.

    Now here is the rub - not the Wintergreen kind! Why does Gurbani, and the SRM, forbid the use of alcohol? Another rub! Is alcohol in any form, and at any concentration, detrimental to health?

    The reasoning behind the thread i just mentioned came from the Alcoholic Anonymous perspective -- the obvious concern that alcohol, even the smallest amount, might trigger a relapse. From a religious perspective, alcohol, even the smallest amount, might cloud the senses and prevent a person from living a clean and moral life. From a health perspective alcohol has been statistically linked to numerous physical problems. The American Cancer Association in a 2012 comprehensive study identified alcohol as the only item we consume that can be statistically linked to at least 8 different forms of cancer. All the other food-lore stories about bad food gunas and good food and supplement gunas have not been supported to date. Those are the 3 themes that I have gathered from discussions over time.

    The buzz factor.

    The information is good to have so individuals can decide what choices to make, and why they are making those choices. Personally, I think the discussion runs aground when we moralize and advise others what to do. You don't strike me as the kind of guy whose sharpness of mind or keen moral nature has been harmed by a great flambe.
     
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  7. Tejwant Singh

    Tejwant Singh United States
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    Spnadmin ji,

    Guru Fateh.

    I agree. It is the burning subject indeed when especially applied on fresh wounds, but on the other hand, it is said to also act as a healing agent at the same time.

    Morality is the very apt term when used subjectively or rubbed with a cotton ball when we get our blood drawn or when some healing potion is pumped in us through a syringe.

    Marathon runners accumulate lactic acid during their long runs which is caused due to the alcoholic fermentation in our body.

    Our tummies are the vats where our food ferments in order to create energy for our survival and we all know fermentation does produce alcohol with the help of sugar which we consume through carbs, in our beverages like tea, coffee and others.

    And, from the moral point of view, even through Karah Prashad.

    Bhole soh Nihal. Sat Siriiiiiiiiiiii Akaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaal.
     
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  8. Inderjeet Kaur

    Inderjeet Kaur
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    As many of you know, my husband drank himself to death; he had virtually no liver left when he died. I have an understandable aversion to alcohol.

    Nevertheless, I do use pure vanilla extract in baking and mirin in Japanese cooking; there is simply no palatable alternative. I have used non alcoholic wine in my French cooking. The flavour is close enough for my jaded palate. Near beer works fine in barbecued food.

    I am a vegetarian and so some of the substitutions are out for me.

    There is one thing, though. If anyone ever offers me a drink of Dom Perignon champagne, I doubt I'd say no. Don't tell anybody, though, OK?
     
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    #7 Inderjeet Kaur, Jun 17, 2013
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  9. linzer

    linzer Mexico
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    The fact of the matter is that all the alcohol dissipates in the cooking process

    Absolutely!!
    Also, the extracts that are listed, most of them are alcohol based. I'ts much easier to go add to much and ruin your dish.
    I say as long as your'e not cooking like the Galloping Gourmet, little for the dish, little for me, little bit more for me. I think you're fine.
     
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  10. Luckysingh

    Luckysingh Canada
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    Yep, 1969 vintage is the rare one to try and get hold of !!
    -especially a Magnum !!:blueturban:
    - I have a collection of corks from other years especially 90's. (BTW. I don't drink anymore but I've had more than my fair share of champagnes, as I was never a beer drinker!!)
     
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    #9 Luckysingh, Jun 18, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013
  11. Inderjeet Kaur

    Inderjeet Kaur
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    My drinking days are long over, but I was partial to exceptional cognac. I guess I'm low maintenance in everything except booze.

    Anyway, the one thing I have never had is Dom Perignon. I won't go looking for it, but if I'm offered...and no one is looking...:interestedkudi:
     
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  12. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    I can't drink wine, and champagne is really hard on me. One of those people who cannot handle histamines. I detest beer. Harder alcoholic beverages give me violent stomach aches. I have absolutely no legitimate right to lecture anyone about the evils of drink because Nature decided in my case, and therefore, I deserve no credit whatsoever.

    hee hee
     
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  13. findingmyway

    findingmyway
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    WRONG! This is a common urban myth. It is not fact but fiction. More information here:
    http://www.ochef.com/165.htm

    What happened to freedom of choice? This thread was started to provide alternatives for those of us who choose to cook without alcohol. Why does moralising have to come into it? Why is a person who chooses not to use any alcohol judged as a fanatic? How can alcohol within the body be compared to external alcohol when they have COMPLETELY different effects on the body?! Let each choose their own cooking methods and ingredients without being judged.
     
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  14. Inderjeet Kaur

    Inderjeet Kaur
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    What each of us chooses to consume is a personal choice with a couple of exceptions per the SRM:

    Khalsa are not to use tobacco in any form and are forbidden to eat halal meat.

    Other than that, as I understand it, common sense and personal choice prevails. There are one or two mentions of other drugs, too, come to think of it, but it really comes down to personal choice.

    I hope my joking around isn't taken amiss. I don't use alcohol, except the bit in vanilla extract.
     
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