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Bibliography of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji

Discussion in 'Sikh Sikhi Sikhism' started by Admin Singh, Jul 22, 2005.

  1. Admin Singh

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    Bibliography of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji

    Contents

    Part 1: Introduction

    Part 2: Section 1 - General and Historic Studies, A - General Studies

    Part 3: Section 1 - General and Historic Studies, B - Studies of Ancient Gurbani manuscripts (Puratan Biran bare)

    Part 4: Section 2 - Interpretations and Commentaries, A - Studies of interpretive traditions

    Part 5: Section 2 - Interpretations and Commentaries, B - Commentaries and exegesis in Punjabi

    Part 6: Section 2 - Interpretations and Commentaries, C - Translations of Sri Guru Granth Sahib

    Part 7: Section 3 - Conceptual Studies, A - Theological and Metaphysical studies

    Part 8: Section 3 - Conceptual Studies, B - Ethics and Social Philosophy

    Part 9: Section 3 - Conceptual Studies, C - Mystical and Mythological writings

    Part 10: Section 4 - Linguistic Studies, A - Gurbani Grammars

    Part 11: Section 4 - Linguistic studies, B - Studies of Gurbani pronunciation (ucharan)

    Part 12: Section 4 - Linguistic studies, C - Studies of Gurmukhi Script

    Part 13: Section 5 - Literary studies, A - General

    Part 14: Section 5 - Literary studies, B - Bhagats and Bhagat-Bani

    Part 15: Section 6 - Musicological studies

    Part 16: Section 7 - Reference literature

    Part 17: Section 8 - Gurbani Search Tools
     
    #1 Admin Singh, Jul 22, 2005
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  3. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Bibliography of Guru Granth Ji

    Waheguru Ji ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki fateh.

    Every SIKH who is even remotely interested in gettign to "know" Our GURU JI intimately....MUST read this valuable work done by the Panthic weekly/Win Forum Staff. I have read it since it began to be serialised on my email....and i cant have enough of it..its THAT GOOD.

    MY hearty congratulations to the Panthic weekly staff writers and all involved in this. may Guru Ji Bless you all with more sewa of Guru Ji.

    Jarnail Singh Gyani Arshi
     
  4. Astroboy

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    ਨਾਮ ਤੇਰੇ ਕੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਲਗਾਈ (Previously namjap)
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    Anoop Singh - Panthic Weekly Staff

    An Introduction

    (KP) - Bibliography can be defined as 'a list of books, articles, or other published writings on a particular subject or by a particular author.' This particular bibliography is related to the field of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Studies. It is one of the few (if any) such bibliographies written in the English language. In the coming weeks, this bibliography will be serialized in The Panthic Weekly, containing details of more than a hundred academic and scholarly writings.

    Bibliographies have a great value for both advanced scholars and upcoming students. However, this work is meant for young Sikhs who are interested in Gurbani and are eager to learn about their meanings. The list of books provided in this work will be helpful for them in their self-study. The Bibliography will guide the users through the study of various aspects of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, providing a set of varying perspectives from famous scholars in this field.

    The need for such a work is strongly felt, when we follow the thousands of young Sikhs debating daily on subjects related to Gurbani, on various internet sites and forums. We find a lack of proper sources and opinions are aired as certian knowledge. Such ways of communication can be identified as flat or horizontal discussion, where the participants are at a rather similar level of understanding. For those who want to dedicate some of their lives to the study of Gurbani and achieve a higher level of understanding, there is a need for textual sources, such as books and published articles, written by scholars of Sikhism and Gurbani. No doubt, subjective views can in some cases be correct, but any serious student of Gurbani should rely upon textual sources of knowledge. Therefore, this bibliography would be beneficial.

    The Bibliography is divided into eight sections, and will be serialized in about twenty parts. It contains bibliographic information about historical, conceptual, lingual, literary and musical (raag-sangeet) studies of Gurbani. Apart from this, details about various commentaries (teeka) and reference works (kosh) related to Gurbani will also be presented. This bibliography includes a survey of various Gurbani research tools and software.

    Every section has a short introduction, followed by a more detailed survey of the works written in that particual subject. This bibliography cannot be regarded as a fully annotated one, however the comments presented in each section give the reader a historic overview of the various studies that have been conducted so far.

    We have tried to expose our young readers to a very broad field of Gurbani studies, and therefore different views and traditions have been represented in the titles found in this bibliography. In most cases, we have produced all the necessary details of the cited works, as found in any other conventional bibliography. However, the work is by no means complete. As new studies of Gurbani provide light on hitherto undiscovered attributes of Sri Guru Sahib's Holy Words, this bibliography will need updating.

    Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji is the Word of Guru Sahiban, filled with megascopic wisdom and philosophy, which contains Naam. Any controversial books or articles listed herein should be seen as a natural component of our broad presentation of Gurbani studies. Our firm belief is that Gurbani is the revealed Word and nothing will change that. We hope that our readers find this series beneficial. Any questions related to contents in this work can be directed to the writer or the editors of The Panthic Weekly.


    Section 1 - General and Historic Studies - A: General Studies

    Introduction

    The Words of Guru Sahiban, Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji have been the focus of numerous research works conducted by both Sikh and non-Sikh scholars. Gurbani is what defines Sikhism. Any research that is related to the Sikh religion and people ought to be based upon this notion. However, in this section we will look at studies that have had Gurbani itself as their primary theme. These are studies that give us information about the contents, composition, history and authority of Sri Guru Granth Sahib.


    Lots of writings have been written with the purposes of missionary activity and spreading information about Gurbani among the masses. The information found in such works is basically the knowledge that has been fully accepted in the tradition, and lacks new perspectives. Secondly, basic information about Gurbani is found in the introductory parts of works related to different aspects of Gurbani. These introductions give insight into the contents of their work, and can be useful for readers who do not prefer to consult the whole book. Meanwhile, historical studies of Gurbani have become an important part of Sikh studies, as scholars questioning the authority of Gurbani try to re-write the history of Sri Adi Granth Sahib's composition. This has led to a wave of scholarly works trying to prove the authority and Guru-status of Gurbani. Such research is deeply connected to the studies of Gurbani manuscripts.

    Studies

    Rattan Singh Jaggi (1991) and Giani Joginder Singh have written introductory works on Sri Guru Granth Sahib, which are useful for students of Gurbani. These works are based upon the Sikh tradition, with some insight into the new linguistic and historic discoveries.



    The beginning of historical studies of Gurbani can be traced to Prof. Sahib Singh, who had started his research on the subject already in 1946. Before him, Dr. Charan Singh, maternal grandfather of Bhai Vir Singh had written Bani Beora in 1902, but he had focused on the musicial components and raag system of Gurbani. Prof. Sahib Singh based his research upon the writings of Kavi Santokh Singh, Giani Gian Singh and Gurbilas Patshahi Chehvi. The classic works by these scholars contained some references about making of Gurbani. However, their focus was on the overall history of the Sikhs. Gurbilas Patshahi Chehvi tells about the ceremonies conducted at Sri Harimandir Sahib at the time of installation of Sri Adi Granth. Secondly, Prof. Sahib Singh relied upon traditional Sikh accounts, such as Janam-Sakhis to construct his historical model of Gurbani composition. Principal Harbhajan Singh (1981) developed the historial-lingual approach of Prof. Sahib Singh, mainly in the field of Gurbani pronunciation. He also highlighted the issue regarding the length of Mul-Mantar or Mangalacharan before Japji Sahib.

    Giani Mahã Singh, editor of Khalsa Samachar published his book about the making of Sri Adi Granth in 1954. The background of his book was the controversy regarding the installation date of Sri Adi Granth at Sri Harimandir Sahib. Kesar Singh Chibber's Bansawalianama Patshahian Dasa Ka records 1601 AD as the year of composition of Gurbani, however Giani Mahã Singh argues that 1604 AD was the correct year. Later on, Ganda Singh (1972) and Giani Bhagat Singh 'Heera' (1992) have written works about the Guru-status of Gurbani in response to claims made by breakaway sects such as Nirankaris and Naamdharis who questioned the authority of Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji in favor of their human-gurus.
    As universities and research institutions were formed in Punjab in the 60s, new works came forward. Surinder Singh Kohli wrote 'A Criticle Study of Adi Granth' in 1961, keeping in mind the modern ideals of research work. In 1974 Dr. Mohinder Kaur Gill's book on the composition of Sri Guru Granth Sahib was published. This work was based upon her PhD-thesis. Piara Singh Padam's 'Sri Guru Granth Parkash' from 1977 includes an introduction and an analytical part. This work is one of the famous philosophical studies of Gurbani conducted in this period. In the same period we find works by Hindi scholars such as Dr Jayaram Mishar (1960), Dharam Pal Maini (1962, 1966) and Manmohan Sehgal who have tried to study Gurbani in the context of Indian spirituality.


    In the past ten years, historical research upon Sri Guru Granth Sahib has been conducted at various universities in USA and Canada. Supported by foreign research institutions, Pashaura Singh and Gurinder Singh Mann published their works related to Gurbani. The contents of their works created a controversy in the Panthic circles. In response to their views, Chandigarh-based Sikh scholars at Institute of Sikh Studies launched a campaign to counter the 'anti-Sikh' school. Another prolific scholar of Gurbani history, Giani Gurdit Singh has published two volumes on the history of Sri Guru Granth Sahib, related to Bhagat-Bani and Mundaavani. It seems that Giani Gurdit Singh has gained appreciation in wider sections of the Sikh community, despite efforts by traditional forces to get his writings censored.


    Section 1 - General and Historic Studies, B: Studies of Ancient Gurbani manuscripts (Puratan Biran bare)

    Introduction




    The word 'puratan biran' is used for ancient manuscripts of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji. By ancient we mean not only the hand-written volumes (hath-likhat biran), but also the volumes that were published through stone lithography (patthar shappa), before the modern printing press was introduced.

    In the Sikh tradition, we find three major branches of Gurbani manuscripts. The most important is the Sri Adi Bir Sahib or Kartarpuri Bir, compiled in 1604 at the orders of Sri Guru Arjan Dev Ji, and later given the Guru-status (gur-gaddi) by Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji in 1708 AD under the name of Damdami Bir. The standard printed versions of Gurbani are based upon this Bir. Second branch is the Bhai Banno vali Bir, that includes some extra writings. While the third is called Lahore vali Bir or Gianian vali Bir. Most Gurbani manuscripts can be related to these three branches. However, there are some other manuscripts that are not based on any of these three scriptural traditions.

    Studies of ancient Gurbani manuscripts can be divided into three kinds depending upon the scope of the studies. First of all, scholars study the text (paath) and try to distinguish the specific manuscripts from the standard printed volumes. Apart from this, some are interested in the method of editing (sampadan kala) and they try to construct a model for the so-called 'evolution of Gurbani text,' as it was passed through the Guru Sahiban and enriched with spiritual knowledge at different stages of the Guru Sahiban's lives. These two kind of studies can be identified as philology or critical studies of Gurbani text. Other kinds of studies of Gurbani manuscripts are paleographic studies that focus on the development of Gurmukhi script (lipi) through the past centuries. In this section, we will look at general and text critical studies of Gurbani manuscripts. Another part of this bibliography is dedicated to studies of Gurmukhi script.

    Studies


    This subject is a very delicate one. Research scholars, while denying the traditional accounts, add their own assumptions and end up creating controversies in the Panth. In recent times, several such scholars who have questioned the authenicity of some ancient manuscripts have recieved tankhah (religious punishment) from Sri Akaal Takht Sahib. In this bibliography, we will mention some of their works and try to indicate how they hurt Sikh sentiments.

    Basic information about Gurbani manuscripts kept in various library collections is found in catalogues published by the related institutions. In Punjabi, there are two such catalogues compiled by Shamsher Singh Ashok and Kirpal Singh. Christopher Shackle has published catalogues of Punjabi manuscripts in the India Office Library. Jeevan Deol is also working on a similar catalogue of all Punjabi manuscripts outside South Asia. Shamsher Singh Ashok's works are important as they include information about the 'destroyed or lost' manuscripts formerly kept at the Sikh Reference Library, Amritsar.

    An important issue that has occupied a lot of attention among Sikh scholars is the authenticity of the pre-Kartarpuri Bir manuscripts, namely the two Goindval pothis; Ahiapur vali pothi and Pinjore vali pothi. Traditionally, these Pothis are said to have been compiled at the times of Guru Amardas Ji and scribed by Sahansram, grandson of Guru Sahib and son of Baba Mohan, based at Goindval Sahib. The Ahiapur pothi is still present at Jalandhar, while the second pothi is found at Pinjore.

    Historic works such as Rahitnama of Chaupa Singh ji, Bansawalianama, Mahima Prakash, Bhagatmala, Gurpartap Suraj Granth and Giani Gian Singh's writings mention the existence of Gurbani manuscripts. However, the research studies of Gurbani manuscripts started with the works of G.B. Singh (1944). Before him, Prof. Sahib Singh and Prof. Teja Singh had been working on the subject. Both of them were of the view that the compilation of Gurbani began with Guru Nanak Sahib. Teja Singh accepted the traditional view that Guru Arjan Dev Ji borrowed the Goindval Pothis from Baba Mohan before compiling Sri Adi Granth. Meanwhile, Prof. Sahib Singh argued that Guru Arjan Dev Ji had recieved a manuscript from Guru Ramdas Ji that included the Bani of the first four Guru Sahiban. Thus, already in the early half of the twentieth century, there existed a scholarly debate about the pre-Kartarpuri Bir manuscripts.

    In his book Prachin Biran, G.B. Singh gives information about 38 historic Gurbani manuscripts. He supports Prof. Teja Singh's view that Guru Sahib borrowed the Goindval Pothis from Baba Mohan, but he also recommends that Guru Sahib collected Bani from the oral traditions of local communities. Meanwhile, he argued that Guru Tegh Bahadur Ji's Bani was added to Sri Adi Granth Sahib during their lifetime, before 1675. One of the reasons why his works were not accepted in Sikh circles was because of his views against the Kartarpuri Bir and other historic pothis. In repsonse to G.B. Singh, Bhai Jodh Singh wrote Prachin Biran bare in 1945, based upon articles published in Khalsa Samachar. The raagmaala controversy had already hit the Sikh Panth, and G.B. Singh's book presented some evidence against this composition. But Bhai Jodh Singh who had examined the contents of Kartarpuri Bir as part of a research committee, constituted by the SGPC that year, was of the opposite view. Using Giani Mahã Singh's notes, Bhai Jodh Singh compiled another book Kartarpuri Bir de Darshan, that was published some years later in 1968. Sardar Daljeet Singh's work on Kartarpuri Bir from 1987 is a continuation of Bhai Jodh Singh's views. The information found in Bhai Jodh Singh's works about the Goindval Pothis was based upon the writings of Bawa Prem Singh Hoti from the mid-1940s. In 1987, his writings, under the title Baba Mohan valian Pothian, were edited and published by Dr Gursharan Kaur Jaggi.

    Some other interesting works from this period are Swami Harnaamdass Udasin's Puratani Biran te Vichar in two volumes, and the writings of Piara Singh Padam, SGPC-based research scholars Randhir Singh, Kundan Singh and Gian Singh Nihang (1977). Randhir Singh, et al., give a list of textual variations found in Gurbani manuscripts and the printed versions of Sri Guru Granth Sahib. The work was based upon manuscripts found in the Sikh Reference Library. A similar work, published by the SGPC gave information about the standard printed edition of Gurbani. It was authored by Rawel Singh (1959).
    In the past decade or so, four major works related to Gurbani manuscripts have been published. However, most of the research has been a matter of discussion and controversy in Panthic circles. Pashaura Singh wrote his doctoral dissertation at the University of Toronto in 1991. The striking contents of his work brought him to Sri Akal Takht for tankhah in 1994. With a limited comparison of Gurbani manuscripts, he tried to formulate the 'editorical policy' of Guru Arjan Dev Ji. He argued that Guru Sahib created several drafts of Gurbani before the Kartarpuri Bir, thus applying that they didn't compile Sri Adi Granth at one time, something that was taken as an attack on Sri Guru Granth Sahib. Following this, the Chandigarh-based Centre of Sikh Studies published an alarming work about the biased research done at North-American universities on Sri Guru Granth Sahib.

    Meanwhile in Punjab, Piar Singh's Gatha Sri Adi Granth was published by Guru Nanak Dev University (GNDU) in 1992. This work also became the matter of a serious controversy. Piar Singh gives a detailed description of forty-four Gurbani manuscripts. Like G.B. Singh, he made the claim that the present-day Kartarpuri Pothi was not the Bir prepared by Bhai Gurdas under Guru Arjan Dev Ji's supervision. Such conclusions pressured GNDU to withdraw the book from publication. Piar Singh was also given tankhah. Later on, Piar Singh went on to publish parts of his book in English under the title Gatha Sri Adi Granth and the Controversy. However, Balwant Singh Dhillon (1999) has questioned the authority of GNDU-MS # 1245, that formed the basis of both Piar Singh and Pashaura Singh's theories about early Sikh scriptural tradition.

    After this, two more works related to Goindval Pothis arrived. The first was written by Gurinder Singh Mann (1996) and the other by GNDU-based Pritam Singh (1998). While Mann accepts the traditional approach about Guru Arjan Dev Ji borrowing the Pothis from Baba Mohan, Pritam Singh argues otherwise. In many ways, the same debate that happened between Sahib Singh and Teja Singh about the 'borrowing theory or succession theory' has been revitalized in these two works. Gurinder Singh Mann had examined both the Pothis and written a work based upon the tradition. He does not agree with G.B. Singh and Pashaura Singh's views that oral sources, along with Goindval Pothis, were also used while compiling Sri Adi Granth. However, Pritam Singh rejected the traditional stand and argued that the Pothis were compiled by Baba Mohan in order to challenge the authority of Guru Arjan Dev Ji. Only the first volume of Pritam Singh's work has yet been published, the second part will be the author's edition of Ahiapur vali Pothi.

    Works Cited

    Bachittar Singh, Giani, ed. Planned Attack on Aad Sri Guru Granth Sahib. Chandigarh: International Centre of Sikh Studies, 1994.
    Daljit Singh. Essays on the Authenticity of Katarpuri Bir and The Integrated Logic and Unity of Sikhism. Patiala: Punjabi University, 1987.
    Dhillon, Balwant Singh. Early Sikh Scriptural Tradition, Myth and Reality. Amritsar: Singh Brothers, 1999.
    Gurbaksh (G.B.) Singh. Sri Guru Granth Sahib dian Prachin Biran. Lahore: Modern Publications, 1944.
    Jaggi, Gursharan Kaur, ed. Babe Mohan valian Pothian. Delhi: Arsi, 1987.
    Jodh Singh, Bhai. Kartarpuri Bir de Darshan. 3rd ed. Patiala: Punjabi University, 1990 [1968].
    Jodh Singh, Bhai. Prachin Biran bare Bhullan di Sodhan. Ludhiana: Lahore Book Shop, 1947.
    Mann, Gurinder Singh. The Goindval Pothis: the Earliest Extant Source of the Sikh Canon. Cambridge: Harvard Oriental Series, 1996.
    Mann, Gurinder Singh. The Making of Sikh Scripture. New York: Oxford UP, 2001.
    This work is a published version of the PhD thesis compiled by the author in 1993 at Columbia University, USA.
    Pashaura Singh. Guru Granth Sahib: Canon, Meaning and Authority. New Delhi: Oxford UP, 2000.
    Piara Singh Padam. Sri Guru Granth dian Puratan Biran. 2nd ed. Patiala: Kalam Mandir Loyar Mall, 1990.
    Piar Singh. Gatha Sri Adi Granth. Amritsar: Guru Nanak Dev University, 1992.
    Piar Singh. Gatha Sri Adi Granth and the Controversy. Grand Ledge, Mich.: Anant Education and Rural Development Foundation, 1996.
    Pritam Singh, ed. Ahiapur wali Pothi. Vol. 1, Bhumika. Amritsar: Guru Nanak Dev University, 1998.
    Randhir Singh, et al., eds. Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji dian Santhya-Sanchian ate Puratan Hathlikhit Pavan Biran de Praspar Path-Bhedan di Suchi. Amritsar: Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committer, 1977.
    Rawel Singh. Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee valõ Chhapi Gai Shri Guru Granth Sahib Ji di Bir bare Zaroori Vakfiat. Amritsar: SGPC, 1959.
    Sahib Singh. Adi Bir Bare. Patiala: Punjab Language Department, 1970.
    Shackle, Christopher. Catalogue of the Punjabi and Sindhi Manuscripts in the India Office Library. London: India Office Library and Records, 1977.
    Shamsher Singh Ashok. Punjabi Hathlikhatan di Suchi. 2 vols. Patiala: Punjab Language Department, 1961-1963.
    Also see by the same author 'Saada Hath-Likhat Punjabi Sahit: A descriptive catalogue of manuscripts and rare books in Guru Ram Das Library and Central Sikh Museum'. Amritsar: Sikh History Research Board, 1968, 520 p. These catalogues contain information on the collection of manuscripts and books held at Sikh Reference Library before 1984.
    Udasin, Swami Harnaamdass. Adi Shri Guru Granth Sahib dian Puratani Biran te Vichaar. 2 vols. Kapurtala: Kantesh Pharmecy, 1969-1972.


    Next Week -Section 2 - Interpretations and Commentaries - A: Commentaries/Exegesis in Punjabi.
     
  5. Zafarnamah

    Zafarnamah
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    Vahiguru ji ka Khalsa, Vahiguru ji ki Fateh!

    Can someone post the remaining parts. I am attaching parts 1-7, but the remaining parts 8-17 are missing and would be great if someone can do the seva of posting them.

    Vahiguru ji ka Khalsa, Vahiguru ji ki Fateh!
     

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  6. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Zafaranamah!

    You know I have ever single one either bookmarked or in pdf formats. They are very good, very good. A curriculum.

    Thank you and I will post them a bit at a time.

    Narayanjot Kaur
     
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  7. Zafarnamah

    Zafarnamah
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    Vahiguru ji ka Khalsa, Vahiguru ji ki Fateh!

    The taliban at Pathic.org has deleted this labor of love for reasons best known to itself. They appear to be extremely close-minded and petty. They must have disagreed with something in it and censored the entire thing. It must have taken several months to compile this bibliography and it deserves to be read.

    I have managed to re-create the bibliography using the Archive.org's Wayback machine: Internet Archive: Wayback Machine, which stores all the old webpages.

    I am attaching the biliography as a single formatted PDF for easy viewing.

    May the Guru bless whoever wrote this work under the alias Anoop Singh.

    Vahiguru ji ka Khalsa, Vahiguru ji ki Fateh!
     

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  8. spnadmin

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    Zafaranamah ji

    Thanks for this information! You are right because I checked my bookmarks and the articles are gone from panthic.org. The series was one of the most illuminating resources on the web and part of my early education into Sikhism. I was always so impressed by its clarity and its broad use of reference material. It is so sad to here that it is no available. Thanks for your seva in preserving it.

    There have been changes to the editorial direction of panthic.org. Some make a joke of it, and others of us are saddened. I will check your link.
     

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