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At the Guru's Door

Discussion in 'New to Gurdwara' started by arshi, Aug 31, 2009.

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  1. arshi

    arshi United Kingdom
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    AT THE GURU'S DOOR
    An audience with Guru Granth Sahib
    by Rajinder Singh ‘Arshi’

    There are times when I feel quite lonely. This feeling is evident even when I am surrounded by people. On such occasions I usually find myself driven towards the Gurdwara(1). Once inside the Gurdwara, this feeling begins to fade away as I proceed towards the ‘main hall’, where Guru Grant Sahib is holding Darbar(2). Each step I take towards my Guru I can feel him taking a thousand steps towards me. I am filled with a sense of security and a warm glow within assures me the Guru is pleased to see me.

    My journey is completed when I lay my forehead on the lotus feet of Guru Granth Sahib. Touching the lotus feet of the Guru is an experience which is hard to relate. Through the Grace of my Guru, I feel as if I am in communion with God, such is the degree of spiritual uplift experienced in body, mind and soul. Guru Nanak, in his Mool Mantra - japji (3), asserts that God can only be realised by the Guru’s Grace.

    On raising my forehead it seems as if I have unburdened all my problems at my Guru’s feet, it is now up to the Guru to give me strength and guidance. For this I take my place in the sangat (congregation) facing the Guru Granth Sahib. Sitting down cross-legged on the floor generates humility of both mind and soul. Worldly status means little in the Gurus Durbar (Court). This audience with my Guru goes a long way in eliminating ego which otherwise is so difficult to harness.

    As I close my eyes and attune myself to the recital of the Holy Guru Granth Sahib my soul begins to focus on the Name of the True Lord. Each word casts its soothing warmth upon my troubled soul and, within moments, I find myself on a different plain. I shut myself from the outside world; suddenly it holds little meaning for me, its image begins to fade away, until it completely disappears from my mind. Only the Lord’s Name rings in the heart.

    The grip of the five thieves: lust anger, greed, attachment and ego, begins to loosen and, as soon as I leave the egoistic plain, my soul begins to be attuned to the Will of the Lord, and He renders me assistance in defeating the five vices.

    I do not claim to be completely free from the grip of the five thieves, but the ease with which I am able to exalt myself to a higher level of existence, with the blessing of Guru Granth Sahib, convinces me to be a Sikh.








    Notes:
    (1) Gurdwara - derived from ‘Guru Dwara’, literally means ‘Guru’s Door’ or ‘Guru’s Abode’. The term ‘Sikh Temple’ must be avoided, as it does not reflect the true meaning of the term Gurdwara i.e. the place where the Guru resides.

    “Wherever my Guru goes and holds his Court, that place is beautifll (Holy)”

    (2) The Gurdwara is, therefore, the Holy place where Guru Granth Sahib holds court (Guru Darbar). It is a place where one meditates and worships the True Lord, a place from which one seeks divine knowledge, spiritual guidance, bliss and peace of mind.

    Whenever Guru Granth Sahib is to hold court, it is ‘escorted’ from the Sachkhand (the realm of Truth, - Guru’s resting place) by Sikh devotees with the same respect and reverence as previously accorded to the Sikh Gurus in human form. Guru Granth sahib then graces the takhat (spiritual throne, adorned with costly cloth, supported by cushions underneath a canopy which symbolizes (denotes) spiritual authority and reverence. The Granthi ji (Sikh priest) unwraps the Adi Granth with utmost care and respect, and when reciting from it he holds a clean cloth a few inches away from his mouth to ensure that impurities of moth and breath do not come into contact with the Holy Guru Granth Sahib.

    (3) The ‘Mool Mantra (the Main Theme, the Proem) is the prelude to the Japji which delineates the Eternal Truth (God) in just fourteen words. The Japji is a deeply reflective work of Guru Nanak, composed by him in his most mystic moments of communion with God.
     
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  3. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    wow..another "Arshi" joins me on SPN....I took this Nom de Plume from SS Charan Singh "Arshi" who was a famous Comedy writer of Punjabi and a Journalist par excellence..he began with the Pen name "arshi"..later changed it to Shaheed...so he is more famous as SS Charan singh shaheed. I always wished i could write haas rass - comedy as well as he could...He is known as the King of Punajbi haas Rass.

    Very well written piece...excellent material for sikhs and non-sikhs wanting to elarn about the Gurdwara, SGGS and Gurmatt.:welcome::welcome:
     
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  4. arshi

    arshi United Kingdom
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    Thank you Gyani Jarnail Singh ji.

    I adopted the takhalas (nom de plume) in the 1950's when schooling and growing up in Kenya. It was then quite common amongst artists (mainly poets an singers) to use a takhalas. I just followed suit (a copy cat reaction) when I began singing in school and later on the the Voice of Kenya. I looked around for one that no one else was using and hence 'Arshi'.

    Although I was aware of its meaning, I have only realised its true meaning of it recently and I think I did the right thing.
     
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  5. spnadmin

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    arshi ji

    That is so very interesting. I hope you realize that you have many stories and experiences to share with this forum. Please do that. Would you start a thread about your life in Kenya? How fascinating we would find it? Would you start threads on Sikh music, including kirtan, musical instruments, daddi, famous performers from the past, and any area where your artistic experience can teach us. I enjoyed learning just that little bit more about you this morning.
     
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  6. arshi

    arshi United Kingdom
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    Thank you Narayanjot Kaur ji for your kind thoughts.

    I agree life is all about sharing and learning from each other’s experiences.

    My life has spanned three continents Asia, Africa and now UK, where we have been living for over forty years.

    Up till now, I have had little spare time which I have used mainly doing kirtan based, usually, on my own musical compositions (some, with Guru’s Grace, will soon be uploaded on my website). I have also found a little time to write on Sikhism and hope to develop this interest even further. I am still finding my way around the SPN website and for the time being it is more convenient for me to post articles rather than start threads. But in due course when I am more familiar with the site and I have more time I would love to participate in other ways.
     
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  7. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Thats a good start..SPN is going places !!..and we must continuously endeavour to make the SPN Main Page as easy as possible to navigate..find threads, posts so that those new visitors are not "intimidated" by the sheer amount of information we have.I am glad to note that SPN is getting traffic from some of our "elders"..my Generation ( 1950's) and even older....and for them the Internet is a daunting place - IF we want a share of their vast knolwedge - we have to make it easy for them to share it with us.:happy:
     
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  8. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Rajinder Singh "Arshi" ji,
    Gurfateh.

    You are way older than me..i was born in January 1949...and you were already schooling...so you definitely have lots to share with us.

    By the way, the "arshi" you saw being used by singers is because this word is also a Caste - a lot of arshis in Muslim Pakistan. In fact if one Googles "Arshi" you will get a lot of Muslim arshis - many are famous poets, political leaders, writers etc. But as a Takhalas..the word is Vocabulary - ARSH meaning SKY..so Arshi means CELESTIAL..from the Heavens..Heavenly..and certainly Gurbani Kirtan is celestial as well a s takes us humans to Heavenly heights...so you did make the right choice !
    I look forward to more writings from you...its exciting as Kenya and that part of Africa had a very strong Sikh poulation...a lot of hidden talents there...and lots of history..nairobi..mombassa..uganda..etc are famous places in Sikh history..
     
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  9. spnadmin

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    arshi ji

    Again, I can't wait to hear more.
     
  10. arshi

    arshi United Kingdom
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    Giani ji you are absolutely right I adopted the name based on its ‘vocabulary’ connotation as you correctly noted, i.e. from ‘arsh’ to ‘arshi’. At the time I had not realised its Muslim caste link and quite frankly, had I known, it might have dissuaded me from adopting it, as my main criteria, then, was to find an uncommon takhalas – it does not seem so uncommon on the google these days. However, as you are aware, being a takhalas it is always shown in quotation marks to distinguish it from a caste name.

    I also note with great interest your comments regarding the SPN main page. It is an uphill task for the older generation not having been weaned on the internet – it is not easy to compete with the youngsters on this front but we’ll do our best.

    Incidentally, most of my primary and secondary school education took place in Nairobi, Kenya in the 1950s, Mombasa being a popular place to go for holidays.
     
  11. arshi

    arshi United Kingdom
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    Narayanjot Kaur ji It will be a pleasure to share what little knowledge I have with you all. Sikhi is great for a lot of reasons and not the least for of its concept of sharing.

    May Guru Ji bless our younger generation to carry their teachings through the 21st Century and beyond.
     
  12. Joginder Singh Foley

    Joginder Singh Foley United Kingdom
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    WJKKWJKF
    Re going to the Gurdwara and being in the presence of GURUji I find that doing Nitnam/simram has a similar effect on me which can be done anywere i even do it on the underground on my way to/back from work it's great just ignore everyone else close your eyes and have the great pleasure of losing yourself with WAHEGURUji pure bliss.


    :happysingh:
     

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