Welcome to SPN

Register and Join the most happening forum of Sikh community & intellectuals from around the world.

Sign Up Now!

Akal Takhat and Its Authority

Discussion in 'Hard Talk' started by Gyani Jarnail Singh, Dec 9, 2009.

  1. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
    Expand Collapse
    Sawa lakh se EK larraoan
    Mentor Writer SPNer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    Messages:
    7,623
    Likes Received:
    14,188
    Here is Mail from the most respected Elder Manmohan Singh baveja Ji of Australia..who writes...

    Akal Takhat and its authority

    Mon Dec 7, 2009 1:20 am (PST)

    Dear All,

    A few months ago, I posted a question ...... as to how did or from where did Akal Takhat derive its authority?

    Not a single person was able to reply.

    I am posing that question again. Unless we can establish that, Jathedar of
    Akal Takhat has the absolute authority to give unilateral ruling on all Sikh
    affairs, anything Akal Takhat Jathedar says or dictates is irrelevant.

    Akal Takhat had no authority from Guru Sahiban. In fact there was no Akal
    Takhat in Guru Sahiban's time. Sixth Guru Sahib started sitting on a
    platform opposite Sri Harmander Sahib and declared that as his Takhat or
    seat of power to challenge Mogul empire and from there he held his court,
    recieve Sangat and declare his plans. No other Guru Sahiban ever visited
    that place. For a long time, it was called Akal Bunga - not Akal Takhat.
    There is no historical evidence of its being called Akal Takhat, initially.
    Earliest reference is of Maharaja Ranjit Singh arranging an appearance
    before Sarabat Khalsa held at Akal Bunga, where he was given a token Tankha, for violation of Sikh code of conduct by marrying his court dancer.

    After Sri Guru Hargobind jee, it was under control of Moguls, untill Khallsa
    attacked and took control. Later, the place was under control of Mahnats,
    untill SGPC was established after Nakana Sahib Saka, when many Sikhs were brutely murdered there, as they went to protest against Mahant's bad deeds.

    Sikhs got control only around 1925, after passing of Gurdwara Act, which
    authorised Sikhs to form SGPC by electing the management committee by
    voting. It is only after that some actitivities started to create a central
    authority to rule on Sikh affairs, as Sikhs were fragmanted in various
    organisations.

    Then, the four Gurdwaras were declared as Takhats by Sarbat Khalsa and it
    was decided to make all Panthic decisions by joint decisions of 4 Jathedars,
    to be announced from Akal Takhat, due to importance of Darbar Sahib and
    SGPC, being a legal Sikh organisation.

    Initially, the Jathedar of Akal Takhat was appointed by consultation of all
    major Sikh organisations, Sants and Deras, for uniersal acceptance and
    announced by Sarbat Khalsa,

    Somehow, in recent past,Akal Dal politicians controling SGPC, started
    appointing their own person as Jathedar of Akal Takhat. Later, SGPC even
    unilaterly declared Dum Dama Sahib a 5th. Takhat, without consulting other
    Jathedars out of Punjab and without even consulting Sikhs at large. The idea was to have majority of Jathedars 3 out of total 5, under control of SGPC,
    which was in turn under control of Akal Dal politicians.

    Later, SGPC even starting ignoring other two Jathedars - Patna Sahib and
    Hazoor Sahib and started making decisions by three Jathedars of Punjab and
    two head granthis of Harmandar Sahib and Akal Takhat. This, in itself is
    absolutely irregular, as never did any authority vest with these three
    employed Jathdedars of SGPC and two Head Granthis. They have not even
    invited other two Jathedars of Takhat Patna Sahib and Hozoor Sahib. Five
    paid employees, controled by politically appointed SGPC management, have not
    authority over Sikh Panth at all, other than run the Gurdwaras under SGPC.

    Thus, it is time to STOP the wrought and chalange the very base of such
    decision making and suxh annoncement by employees of SGPC.

    SGPC is an organisation formed under Act of Indian parliament and is only
    authorised to manage Gurdwaras in Punjab, as it was after 1947 partition.

    I suggest, Singh Sahib Bhai Darshan Singh and Sarna jee to lodge a complaint
    with Judicial commission, which overseas SGPC and also file a suite in
    Indian courts of law to restrain, such unauthorised bullying by politicians,
    who control SGPC.

    This is flagrant abuse of trust and respect, Sikhs have been giving to Akal
    Takhat, and it is time to define the system, to prevent further abuse.

    Manmohan Singh
    Australia
     
    • Like Like x 6
  2. Loading...


  3. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
    Expand Collapse
    1947-2014 (Archived)
    SPNer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    Messages:
    14,551
    Likes Received:
    19,200
    Re: Controversy Surrounding Prof Darshan Singh Ji

    Gyani ji

    You know that everything that Manmohan Singh ji is saying is true. He is not making any of this up. And it is not his opinion. Everything can be documented. I do not understand why there is so much bowing and scraping. The record of the jathedars has not been too clean either. This should be an open and shut case. And yes, the court should be petitioned on this for violation of due process and misfeasance.

    Thanks for posting it.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
    Expand Collapse
    Sawa lakh se EK larraoan
    Mentor Writer SPNer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    Messages:
    7,623
    Likes Received:
    14,188
    Exactly right Naraynjot ji..thats why when this was first posted on a Forum that also proclaims to have in excess of 10,000 members..NOT a SINGLE REPLY was received..TRUTH has no challengers.

    And also even though parties like IHRo and Pathetic Org set up Legal committees and issued threats to sue anyone who spoke against the Bachitar natak granth..a DOZEN BOOKS have come out challenging the dg..and many thousands of articles utube videos put out..not a single person ahs been charged/brought to court...the BEST they could do is go after the 75 year old invalid Kala afghana of Canada and the 70 year old wheelchair bound darshan Singh ragi....in their own court....of judge/jury and executioner style...A DUBAI based scholar ahs put out a 1 kror rupee REWARD for anyone who can prove the writer of DG...no one has come forward to claim it...

    But i can bet the Inders and the adms are busy even now collecting "evidence" on forums such as spn utube etc to pass to the lambas and all....so that they can go for Round Two of the "Amrtisar Inquisition"...even as i write !! Thats the best they cna do..under the circumstances as their house of cards is built on LIES.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  5. Janpreet

    Janpreet
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2007
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    27
    Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh

    I want to share couple of pics with the sangat of this forums on How Hukamname used to be issued at Akal Takhat. Please have a look:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It is very clear from above pics that the Hukamnama of Akal Takht Sahib is the consensus of Sarbat Khalsa.. It cannot be issued by caretakers (Jathedars) alone of Akal Takhat Sahib by way of personal whims or political pressures.

    The decision should be reached by way of consensus in accordance with the Sikh ideology. This is called Gurmata (the counsel of Guru Sahib). This Gurmata should be issued to the Sikh nation from Akal Takht Sahib as Hukamnama of Sarbat Khalsa or Akal Takht Sahib. This represented the "will of the Sikh nation".
     
    • Like Like x 6
  6. Archived_Member16

    Archived_Member16
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,451
    Likes Received:
    3,761
    Guru Gobind Singh Ji got rid of the 'holy' sinners like the Masands and spread true religion, as per the teachings of Guru Granth Sahib Ji. Guru Ji's TRUE Sikhs have to do similiar cleansing now!
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
    Expand Collapse
    1947-2014 (Archived)
    SPNer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    Messages:
    14,551
    Likes Received:
    19,200
    YES. There isn't a lot of time left for beating around the bush and getting nowhere.
     
  8. kds1980

    kds1980 India
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2005
    Messages:
    4,504
    Likes Received:
    2,738
    The Sikh Encyclopedia(???? ???????) - AKAL TAKHT - Sikh political institutions and movements - The Sikh Encyclopedia(?
    AKAL TAKHT
    Currently 0.00/5
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    0.0/5 (0 vote)

    AKAL TAKHT is the primary seat of Sikh religious authority and central altar for Sikh political assembly. Through hukamnamas, edicts or writes, it may issue decretals providing guidance or clarification on any point of Sikh doctrine or practice referred to it, may lay under penance personages charged with violation of religious discipline or with activity prejudicial to Sikh interests or solidarity and may place on record its appreciation of , outstanding services rendered or sacrifices made by individuals espousing the cause of Sikhism or of the Sikhs.

    The edifice stands in the Darbar Sahib precincts in Amritsar facing Harimandar, now famous as the Golden Temple. The word akal, a negative of kal (time), is the equivalent of timeless, beyond time, everlasting, and takht, in Persian, that of royal throne or chair of state. Akal Takht would thus mean "timeless or everlasting throne" or "throne of the Timeless One, i.e. God." In the Sikh system, God is postulated as Formless (Nirankar), yet to proclaim His sovereignty over His creation, He is sometimes referred to as sultan, patsah, sacha shah, or the True King; His seat is referred to as sachcha takht, the True Throne, sitting on which He dispenses sachcha niao, true justice (GG, 84, 1087).

    It also became common for Sikhs, at least by the time of Guru Arjan (1563-1606), to refer to the Guru as sachcha patshah and to his gaddior spiritual seat as takht and the congregation he led as darbar or court. Panegyrizing the Gurus, the bards Balvand, Nalya and Mathura, in their verses included in the Guru Granth Sahib, use the word takht in this very sense. Formally to proclaim Sikh faith's common concern for the spiritual and the worldly, synthesis of min and pin. Guru Hargobind (1595-1644), son and successor of Guru Arjan, adopted royal style.

    For the ceremonies of succession, he had a platform constructed opposite the Harimandar, naming it Akal Takht. According to Gurbilas Chhevin Patshahi, a detailed versified and, going by the year of composition recorded in the text/colophon, the oldest account of Guru Hargobind's life, the structure was raised on Har vadi 5,1663 Bk/15 June 1606. The Guru laid the cornerstone and Bhai Buddha and Bhai Gurdas completed the construction, no third person being allowed to lend a helping hand. Guru Hargobind used the takht for the accession ceremonies which, according to the source quoted, took place on 26 Har sudi 10, 1663 Bk/24 June 1606. From here he conducted the secular affairs of the community.

    From here he is said to have issued the first hukamnama (q.v.) to far flung sangats or Sikh centres announcing the creation of Akal Takht and asking them to include in their offerings thenceforth gifts of weapons and horses. Bhai Gurdas was named officiant in charge of the Akal Takht. A building subsequently raised over the Takht was called Akal Bunga (house) so that the Takht is now officially known as Takht Sri Akal Bunga although its popular name Akal Takht is more in common use.

    The Sikhs recognize four other holy places as takhts, namely Takht Sri Kesgarh Sahib, Anandpur; Takht Sri Harimandar Sahib, Patna; Takht Sachkhand Hazur Sahib, Abchalnagar, Nanded; and Takht Sri Damdama Sahib, Talvandi Sabo. All four are connected with the life of Guru Gobind Singh (1666-1708). All five Takhts are equally venerated, but the Akal Takht at Amritsar enjoys a special status. Historically, this is the oldest of the takhts and along with Harimandar, across the yard, constitutes the capital of Sikhism.

    Meetings of the Sarbatt Khalsa or general assembly representative of the entire Panth are traditionally summoned at Akal Takht and it is only there that cases connected with serious religious offences committed by prominent Sikhs are heard and decided. Hukamnamas or decrees issued by the Akal Takht are universally applicable to all Sikhs and all institutions. After Guru Hargobind's migration to Kiratpur early in 1635, the shrines at Amritsar, including the Akal Takht, fell into the hands of the descendants of Prithi Chand, elder brother of Guru Arjan, his grandson, Hariji (d. 1696), remaining in charge for over fifty-five years.

    Soon after the creation of the Khalsa in March 1699, Guru Gobind Singh sent Bhai Mani Singh to Amritsar to assume control of the Harimandar and the Akal Takht and manage these on behalf of the Khalsa Panth. During the troublous period following the martyrdom of Banda Singh in 1716, the sacred sarovar, or holy tank, at Amritsar, the Harimandar and the Akal Takht continued to be a source of inspiration and spiritual rejuvenation for the Sikhs. Whenever circumstances permitted, and usually on Baisakhi and Divali, their scattered bands defying all hazards converged upon Akal Takht to hold sarbatt khalsa assemblies and discuss matters of policy and strategy.

    For instance, through a gurmata (Guru's counsel) the sarbatt khalsa at the Akal Takht resolved on 14 October 1745 to reorganize their scattered fighting force into 25 jathas or bands of about 100 warriors each. By another gurmata on Baisakhi, 29 March 1748, the sarbatt khalsa meeting, again, at Akal Takht, formed the Dal Khalsa or the army of the Khalsa consisting of 11 misis or divisions. On Divali, 7 November 1760, the sarbatt khalsa resolved to attack and occupy Lahore (till then Sikhs had not occupied any terrritory, their only possession being the small fortress of Ram Rauni or Ramgarh they had built at Amritsar in 1746).

    Akal Takht was again the venue of the sarbatt khalsa on Baisakhi day, 10 April 1763, when by a gurmata it was decided to go out to the help of a Brahman who had brought the complaint that his wife had been forcibly abducted by the Afghan chief of Kasur. Even after the Punjab had been parcelled out into several Sikh independencies or misis,Amritsar remained the common capital where all sardars or chiefs had built their burigas and stationed their vakils or agents. But as the need for a common strategy and action decreased and rivalries among the misis chiefs raised their head, sarbatt khalsa and correspondingly the Akal Takht lost their political preeminence.

    Maharaja Ranjit Singh felt little need for sarbatt khalsa assemblies after 1805 when it was summoned to consider the question whether or not the fugitive Maratha prince Jasvant Rao Holkar be assisted against the British. The religious authority of the Akal Takht , however, remained intact and the State never challenged it in anymanner. There are in fact instances of the State showing subservience as in the case of Maharaja Ranjit Singh himself responding to the summons from the Akal Takht and accepting for a moral misdemeanour penalty imposed by its custodian, Akali Phula Singh, who had fought as a loyal soldier in several of the Maharaja's military campaigns.

    In spite of its supremacy in the matter of enforcing religious discipline, Akal Takht discharges no divine dispensation. It remits no sins, nor does it invoke God's wrath upon anyone. On several occasions during the eighteenth century, Akal Takht shared with the Harimandar desecration and destruction at the hands of Mughal satraps and Afghan invaders. Ahmad Shah Durrani, who had razed the Harimandar in 1762, again attacked Amritsar in December 1764. On this occasion a small band of 30 Sikhs under their leader, Nihang Gurbakhsh Singh stationed there to serve and protect the Akal Takht, came out to dare the invading horde and fell fighting to the last man.

    Ahmad Shah had the Akal Buriga completely demolished. Sikhs, however, continued to hold the sarbatt khalsa in front of the ruins and decided at one such gathering on Baisakhi, 10 April 1765, to rebuild the Akal Buriga as well as the Harimandar. Funds for this purpose had already been set apart from the pillage of Sirhind in January 1764. The work was entrusted to Bhai Des Raj, who was also furnished with Guru ki Mohar or the Guru's seal to enable him to raise more funds. The construction of the ground floor of the Akal Buriga was completed by 1774.

    The rest of the five storeyed domed edifice was completed during the reign of Maharaja Ranjit Singh. The gilded dome atop the building was built by Hari Singh Nalva at his own expense. The facade of the first four storeys including the basement (originally ground floor but rendered partly below ground level because of the raising of the level of the circumambulatory terrace in front) had a semi circular orientation. The ground floor was a large hall with an attached pillared marble portico. The facades of the next two floors had projected eaves supported on decorative brackets. The facade of the third floor, a large hall with galleries on the sides, had cusped arched openings, nine in number.

    The exterior of the fourth floor, covering the central hall of the lower floor, was decorated with projected ornamental eaves and a domed kiosk at each corner. The Guru Granth Sahib was seated on the first floor, where the Jathedar of the Akal Takht also took his seat. The second floor was used for important meetings and also for amrit prachar, administration of the initiation of the Khalsa. The hall on the third floor was used especially for the meetings of the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee until a separate office block, called Teja Singh Samundari Hall, was constructed for the purpose during the 1930's.

    The beautiful and sacred edifice was destroyed in the army action, called Operation Blue Star, in early June 1984.The Government of India got the building reconstructed in order to assuage the injured feelings of the Sikhs, but this was not acceptable to them. The reconstructed building was demolished in early 1986 to be replaced by one raised through car seva, voluntary free service of the Panth and by money accruing from voluntary donations. After the death of Guru Gobind Singh with whom ceased the line of living Gurus, hucamnamas were issued in the name of the Khalsa Panth from the different takhts, especially Akal Takht at Amritsar.

    Any Sikh transgressing the religious code could be summoned, asked to explain his conduct and punished.Disobedience amounted to social ostracism of an individual or the group concerned. Maharaja Ranjit Singh, 19th century ruler of the Punjab, was summoned by Akali Phula Singh, the then jathedar of Akal Takht, for violating established norms of Sikh behaviour and laid under expiation. Among instances from recent history a striking one is that of Teja Singh of Bhasaur who was censured for the liberties he was taking with the Sikh canon.

    A hukamnama issued from the Akal Takht on 26 Savan 1985 Bk/9 August 1928 read: The Panch Khalsa Diwan (Panch Khand), Bhasaur, has published books called Gurmukhi courses in which the bani of Sri Guru Granth Sahib has been garbled and its order changed.Changes have been made in gurmantra, the ardas and the ceremonies for administering amrit.These are anti Sikh proceedings. Hence Babu Teja Singh and Bibi Niranjan Kaur [his wife] are hereby excommunicated from the Panth. Other members of the Panch Khalsa Diwan are debarred from having ardas offered on their behalf at Sri Akal Takht Sahib or at any other Gurdwara.

    No Sikh should purchase Gurmukhi courses published by the Panch Khalsa Diwan, nor keep them in his possession. The Panch Khalsa Diwan or whoever else has copies of these should send them to Sri Akal Takht Sahib. An example of an individual penalized for disobeying the Akal Takht edict was that of Bhai Santa Singh, the Nihang, who for the charge brought against him was excommunicated from the Panth (Hukamnama, 8 Savan 515 Nanak Shahi/22 July 1984).

    Hukamnamas have also been issued to settle points of religious and political disputation; also for commending the services to the Panth of individuals and for adding passages to Sikh ardas, the daily prayer of supplication, as a particular historical situation might demand. On 26Jeth 1984 Bk/8June 1927, the Akal Takht eulogized in a hukamnama Bhai Sahib Sardar Kharak Singh for his qualities of determination and steadfastness and for his sacrifices in the cause of the Panth; likewise, on 30 Bhadon 1988 Bk/15 September 1931, Bhai Sahib Randhir Singh was honoured for his outstanding services to the Panth.

    On 20 Asuj 1970 Bk/4 October 1913, Takht Sachkhand Sri Hazur Sahib promulgated a hukamnama fixing the length of kirpan or sword a Sikh will carry slung from across his shoulder at a minimum of one foot. On 12 Magh 483 Nanak Shahi/25 January 1952, Akal Takht enjoined upon the "entire Khalsa and all Gurdwara ministers" to add thesf lines to the ardas : 0 Timeless Lord, the Benevolent One, ever the succourer of Thy Panth, we pray grant the Khalsaji the privilege of unhindered access to and control and maintenance of Sri Nankana Sahib and other holy shrines and sites from which the Panth has been parted [after the partition of the Punjab in 1947]. Such writs promulgated under the seal of a Takht carry sanction for the entire Sikh people.

    References :

    1. Gordon, John J. H. , The Sikhs. Patiala, 1970
    2. Dilgeer, Harjinder Singh, The Akal Takht. Jalandhar, 1980
    3. Kapur Singh, "Akal Takht," in The SJich Sansar. June 1976
    4. Harbans Singh, The Heritage of the Sikhs. Delhi, 1983
    5. Sukhdial Sirigh, Aka/ Takht Sahib. Patiala, 1984
    6. Gian Sirigh, Giani, Twarikh Guru Khalsa [Reprint]. Patiala, 1970
    7. Gurbtfas Chhevin Patshahi. Patiala, 1970
    8. Ganda Sirigh, Hukamname. Patiala, 1967
    9. Ashok, Shamsher Sirigh, Nisan te Hukamname. Amritsar, 1967
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. kds1980

    kds1980 India
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2005
    Messages:
    4,504
    Likes Received:
    2,738
    The people who are challenging authority of Akal takht should first come with the alternative that who will decide solutions for timely problems that sikhism and sikhs will face
    if their is no Akal takht
     
  10. Janpreet

    Janpreet
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2007
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    27
    Kanwardeep Singh Ji, I don't think any one here is challenging authority of Akal Takhat. E-Sangat is just concerned about how Akal Takhat authority is misused by Jathedars (caretakers) under personal grudges and political pressures.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    #9 Janpreet, Dec 10, 2009
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2009
  11. harbansj24

    harbansj24
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    494
    Likes Received:
    887
    This is all very well. But under what law can can the edicts of AT be challenged in the Indian courts, and why? There is no Indian law which will force anyone to obey any edict of AT. In other words, such edicts are not enforceble under Indian judicial system.
    There will be no evidence that SGPC would have instigated the edicts. Just because the Jathedars are employees of SGPC will not automatically mean that the edict is dictated by SGPC.
    All the judges of the Indian judiciary are employed by GOI and that does not mean that the judgments are dictated by GOI.

    Upto 60s the Jathedars were highly regarded Sikhs of the Panth. And any edict was passed only after open and transparent hearing. So there was moral and social pressure on the person to fall in line otherwise he would be boycotted by the Sikhs. That is no longer true now. Buta Singh was once excommunicated. He just ignored it. It did not matter a wee bit to him.
    Under the present Civil Laws neither can Indian courts take cogniscance of complaint against the Jathedars (Unless it is criminal in nature) nor do their edicts have any legal validitity.

    Unless a Sikh personal law is enacted by the Indian Parliament which contains provision for legally binding edicts by AT and which will accept subordination to and supervision of Indian courts, the whole thing is a farce which it deserves to be.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  12. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
    Expand Collapse
    1947-2014 (Archived)
    SPNer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    Messages:
    14,551
    Likes Received:
    19,200
    harbhans ji

    One area where it may be possible to go to court is "denial of due process" as the precedents and procedures for arriving at a Gurmatta were not followed. In other words, an over-stepping of the bounds of civil authority by the jathedars and failure to conform with procedures described in the India Gurdwara Act.

    That a Gurmatta was the proper course of action -- and not properly convened according to the Sikh Rehat Maryada -- could be another area for litigation. In other words the bylaws for the corporate Sikh life were not followed. The SGPC is a legally constituted body under Indian Law and therefore should be accountable for compliance with the law.

    This is actually a good subject for continued discussion. When I have more time, I want to look into it myself. Hardip Singh ji in fact has already begun spotting places in the India Gurdwara Act that have not been followed.

    In the end you may be right. If you are correct, then any verdict of excommunication issued by the jathedars, with or without the agreement of SGPC, would be an empty vessel with no official significance. The Sarbat Khalsa would be the only body with the gravitas to sanction Professor Darshan Singh. Moreover, the SGPC, if it believes that Professor Darshan Singh, has undermined fundamental principles of Sikhism, is duty-bound to convene the Sarbat Khalsa. The Sarbat Khalsa needs be more than 5 people who happen to be standing conveniently in place; and must be more representative than the 40 or so odd members of the SGPC.

    There are questions to ask about legal jurisdiction. There are also questions to be answered regarding the legitimate governance of the Panth.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  13. kds1980

    kds1980 India
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2005
    Messages:
    4,504
    Likes Received:
    2,738
    The Article is clearly challenging the Authority of Akal takht,even asking Indian law to intervene which nothing more than a joke.No Doubt Akal takht Jathedar could be under pressure but we have to understand that politicians
    use religion to enhance their votebank.The question is who give these politician power the answer is people and we all know that sikhs themselves are not much in religion so how could we expect jathedars to be clean honest persons.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
    Expand Collapse
    1947-2014 (Archived)
    SPNer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    Messages:
    14,551
    Likes Received:
    19,200
    Kanwardeep Singh ji

    I see no problem challenging the authority of the jathedars, while retaining respect for the authority of the Akal Takht as an institution. It is pathetic that the jathedars have become political lackeys. They have renounced their greater mission - to serve, to engage in servant leadership. Jathedars are jathedars to serve the panth. That has not happened, and many are dismayed.

    You said earlier and perhaps in a different thread that the Badals, at the head of Shiromani Akali Dal, will control Punjab as along as the majority of voters see SAD as the best party to protect their interests, particularly in agriculture. And if you are correct, then no other party will overtake them and this problem with SGPC, Akal Takht, jathedars, and some individuals like Mr. Lamba, will never go away.

    If you are correct, then the problem can be confined to Punjab, and those other areas where the Gurdwara Act gives SGPC jurisdiction. If that is true, I think we could put this debate to bed and forget about it. Removing SAD would be the only solution. If you are correct, that is not going to happen.

    Here is my problem with that. First of all the SGPC has overstepped its jurisdiction through its many abuses of its proper role as imposed by India law. The Professor Darshan case being only one example. The effects are far-reaching. The entire Diaspora is affected by this case. It will be affected by proposed changes to the Sikh Rehat Marayada. It will be affected by continued intrusions into educational efforts in places far away from India. This situation even has consequences that include creating a lawless atmosphere in which in the Diaspora people have been threatened and possibly murdered because they assumed they had freedom of religious expression.

    Sikhs in the Diaspora have less freedom of religion than any other religion in the United States because of the over-reaching of SGPC. Sikhs in the Diaspora are governed by Indian Laws, agricultural policies, and the voter preferences of Punjab? Does that make sense?

    Of course it does not. The Diaspora, by your own analysis, which BTW is probably correct, is therefore completely dependent on Tewjwinder, Davinder, and Harinder in the Punjab if things are to change.

    One last hope before there is a major revolt, and Sikhism is torn from every direction. A legal challenge within India. SGPC should have called for a Sarbat Khalsa, in this instance and in every other miscarriage of their duties since 1983. The jathedars should refrain from issuing edicts, sandesh, decisions, punishments, and excommunications, before they have received the consensus of a Sarbat Khalsa. And if this situation does not reverse itself, then there will be more turmoil and violence.

    Divide and conquer! Which historical master of India taught Indians that lesson that Badal has learned so well?
     
    • Like Like x 2
  15. Janpreet

    Janpreet
    Expand Collapse
    SPNer

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2007
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    27

Share This Page