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Access Network Improvements?

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by SOSensible, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. SOSensible

    SOSensible
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    Guest

    I know that we would not use an .mdb file for very many users. Has the new
    file structure changed to being more friendly? Does it provide for back end
    queries? Can someone give us the inside view...

    What does the new file system offer? What changed? What are we getting?

    I am sure there are many good or even a few good reasons for the change, but
    no one is taliking it up. :) We are all ears out here... ready for the answer.
     
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  3. Albert D.Kallal

    Albert D.Kallal
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    Guest

    "SOSensible" <SOSensible@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:9158E32A-8313-4DE4-8ECD-1BA1488BA721@microsoft.com...
    >I know that we would not use an .mdb file for very many users. Has the new
    > file structure changed to being more friendly?


    Not sure what you mean by more friendly? If you are talking about
    multi-value fields (complex data), and joins, then yes...more friendly is a
    good term.

    So, there is a new version of the database engine, you can read about it
    here:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/access/archive/2005/10/13/480870.aspx


    >Does it provide for back end
    > queries? Can someone give us the inside view...


    It certainly has improved connection abilities with sharepoint, and
    continues to increase features for use with XML.

    Do remember that access has shipped with two data engines for the last 3
    versions (quite a long time). So, you had a choice of a data engine with
    stored procedures, triggers, and back end quires for 3 versions now.

    > I am sure there are many good or even a few good reasons for the change,
    > but
    > no one is taliking it up. :) We are all ears out here... ready for the
    > answer.


    That link to the developers blog spills a lot of beans on what is new....


    --
    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    pleaseNOOSpamKallal@msn.com
    http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
     
  4. Brendan Reynolds

    Brendan Reynolds
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    Guest

    Your questions seem to relate more to the new data engine than the new file
    format. See the following URL for the reasons behind the new data engine.
    Increasing the ability of the JET data engine to handle larger numbers of
    concurrent users was definitely not one of Microsoft's goals, nor, in my
    opinion, is it ever likely to be. There is no incentive that I can see for
    them to do that.

    http://blogs.msdn.com/access/archive/2005/10/13/480870.aspx

    --
    Brendan Reynolds
    Access MVP

    "SOSensible" <SOSensible@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:9158E32A-8313-4DE4-8ECD-1BA1488BA721@microsoft.com...
    >I know that we would not use an .mdb file for very many users. Has the new
    > file structure changed to being more friendly? Does it provide for back
    > end
    > queries? Can someone give us the inside view...
    >
    > What does the new file system offer? What changed? What are we getting?
    >
    > I am sure there are many good or even a few good reasons for the change,
    > but
    > no one is taliking it up. :) We are all ears out here... ready for the
    > answer.
     
  5. '69 Camaro

    '69 Camaro
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    Guest

    Hi.

    > Can someone give us the inside view...
    > What does the new file system offer? What changed? What are we getting?
    > I am sure there are many good or even a few good reasons for the change,
    > but
    > no one is taliking it up. :) We are all ears out here... ready for the
    > answer.


    Download the betas and take them for a test drive to see for yourself:

    http://www.microsoft.com/office/preview/default.mspx

    HTH.
    Gunny

    See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
    See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
    http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/expert_contributors2.html for contact
    info.


    "SOSensible" <SOSensible@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:9158E32A-8313-4DE4-8ECD-1BA1488BA721@microsoft.com...
    >I know that we would not use an .mdb file for very many users. Has the new
    > file structure changed to being more friendly? Does it provide for back
    > end
    > queries? Can someone give us the inside view...
    >
    > What does the new file system offer? What changed? What are we getting?
    >
    > I am sure there are many good or even a few good reasons for the change,
    > but
    > no one is taliking it up. :) We are all ears out here... ready for the
    > answer.
     
  6. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews
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    Guest

    SOSensible <SOSensible@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >I know that we would not use an .mdb file for very many users.


    Define very many users? 25 - 50 is fine. Any more than that and you
    are likely running a mission critical app which would be better suited
    to SQL Server anyhow.

    Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     
  7. Larry Linson

    Larry Linson
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    Guest

    "Tony Toews" <ttoews@telusplanet.net> wrote

    >> I know that we would not use an .mdb file for very many users.

    >
    > Define very many users? 25 - 50 is fine. Any more than that and you
    > are likely running a mission critical app which would be better suited
    > to SQL Server anyhow.


    Even so, Tony, if most of the users are reading rather than updating, we
    have reliable reports of satisfactory performance with over 100 users in the
    Jet multiuser environment. Of course, I'll add the caveat that to support
    that many concurrent users, all the factors must be "close to perfect":
    hardware and network environments and, in the software, the requirements,
    design, _and_ implementation.

    That having been said, I have worked on a number of database applications
    with an Access client that used ODBC-compatible server DBs (not just
    Microsoft SQL Server) for user audiences that could have been served by a
    multiuser. They wanted reliability, scalability, and recoverability that a
    file-server DB such as Jet just didn't offer. It's a little more effort to
    create a client-server lashup with Access, but only a little.

    Larry Linson
    Microsoft Access MVP
     

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