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Access and Dual Core Processors

Discussion in 'Information Technology' started by Bud Jay, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. Bud Jay

    Bud Jay
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    Guest

    I recently purchased several dual core Athlon machines and involved them in
    a large monthly update. The 'chines are all equiped with XP Pro or XP Media
    Center Edition, and Office 2003. They are all equally updated with patches.

    The original single core 'chines are able to show performance of up to 100%
    CPU usage, but the dual core 'chines only seem to be able to use up to 50 %
    of CPU capacity. The performance meter seems to be split the activity
    between the cores, but the sum total never seems to exceed 50%.

    The dual core 'chines, even though they have a higher number (4200+) vs
    single core 3500s, perform much less well, and take much longer to process a
    block of information in the Access databases. Note that the data is
    duplicated and dedicated to each 'chine, and no outside interactivity is
    needed.

    We suspect that Access 2003 only uses a single core of the two available for
    whatever reason. Can anyone confirm this and point me to any way that the
    Athlon dual core systems can use both cores in an Access 2003 environment?

    Bud Jay

    budjay@jcsm.com

    www.jcsm.com

    www.800-routing.com

    Lakeville Office...

    952-469-5898 (voice and voice mail)

    952-469-3522 (fax)

    1-866-jcsm-com

    (1-866-527-6266 - toll-free)

    Columbia Heights Office...

    763-390-4861 (Voice and voice mail)

    763-390-4873 (Fax)
     
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  3. Albert D.Kallal

    Albert D.Kallal
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    Guest

    > We suspect that Access 2003 only uses a single core of the two available
    > for whatever reason. Can anyone confirm this and point me to any way that
    > the Athlon dual core systems can use both cores in an Access 2003
    > environment?


    This no a different if you use Intel, or AMD......



    Most desktop applications (at least all of the major ones) will NOT
    experience a
    speed up with duel core machines.

    The software industry as a whole does NOT HAVE ANY reasonable technology
    that will split the tasks of a given program over two processors, and then
    have some magical way to put the results together on the other side.


    The results of the above fact/information means that:

    For ms-access, or word, or Excel, or even your favorite super cool game,
    having 1, or 20
    processors WILL NOT MAKE ONE bit of difference. This is not really a
    ms-access
    problem, but a general problem that remains to be solved for the whole
    software industry.


    So, if you run word, or ms-access, or Excel on a 10 processor machine, or 1
    processor machine you will NOT see any difference in performance. This
    information applies to most, of not all of the software you will run on your
    pc.

    However, if you are running MORE THEN one program on your PC, and THOSE
    programs are using processing then you experience a benefit. So, a duel core
    system can't make a single program run faster..but it can run two programs
    at full speed.



    So, if you have one program running, and it is using full processing, and
    then you launch some other program, then it can/will run on the OTHER
    processor. So, more processors will not speed up a single program. However,
    with more processors, then each program you LOAD can run on a DIFFERENT
    processor. This means you don't get as much as a slow down when running MORE
    THEN one program. (and, as mentioned, it means each separate program can run
    on a different processor).



    99% of the time in word, or excel, or ms-access, you are at some prompt, and
    little, if any
    processing is being used.



    In fact, for about the last 4 or more years (even before duel core
    processing), ms-access would not speed up with more processing anyway.
    Ms-access is NOT processing bound, but i/o bound (that means ms-access is
    slow NOT due to processing, but slow due to waiting for the disk drive, or
    the network. These are the big bottle necks, and when you upgrade your pc,
    you are not really speeding up the disk drive, or the speed of your
    network -- these are the major bottle necks, and they are not faster now
    then they were 5 years ago).



    So, it has been a NUMBER of years that throwing more processing at a
    ms-access will not help.

    So, to answer your question, no, ms-access does not take advantage of duel
    processors. Nor does your favorite game, or even auto CAD. However, ALL
    SOFTWARE will benefit from a duel core processors IF YOU ARE RUNNING more
    then one program at the SAME TIME (and ALSO those other programs are max
    processing load).



    If you are experience a slow down in ms-access, then check your setup, the
    best list of things to check is here, and some of them often make a
    SUBSTANTIAL difference.



    http://www.granite.ab.ca/access/performancefaq.htm
    --
    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    pleaseNOOSpamKallal@msn.com
    http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
     
  4. Bud Jay

    Bud Jay
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    Guest

    Albert and All....

    Thanks for the detailed reply. Actually, the application, with much
    tweeking, IS processor bound, not I/O bound. That is why it seemed so
    evident that Access was using only one core.

    Based on this, I will test next if throughput increases if I run two copies
    of Access in the same 'chine.

    "Albert D.Kallal" <PleaseNOOOsPAMmkallal@msn.com> wrote in message
    news:O2AZdrHrGHA.3720@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> We suspect that Access 2003 only uses a single core of the two available
    >> for whatever reason. Can anyone confirm this and point me to any way
    >> that
    >> the Athlon dual core systems can use both cores in an Access 2003
    >> environment?

    >
    > This no a different if you use Intel, or AMD......
    >
    >
    >
    > Most desktop applications (at least all of the major ones) will NOT
    > experience a
    > speed up with duel core machines.
    >
    > The software industry as a whole does NOT HAVE ANY reasonable technology
    > that will split the tasks of a given program over two processors, and then
    > have some magical way to put the results together on the other side.
    >
    >
    > The results of the above fact/information means that:
    >
    > For ms-access, or word, or Excel, or even your favorite super cool game,
    > having 1, or 20
    > processors WILL NOT MAKE ONE bit of difference. This is not really a
    > ms-access
    > problem, but a general problem that remains to be solved for the whole
    > software industry.
    >
    >
    > So, if you run word, or ms-access, or Excel on a 10 processor machine, or
    > 1
    > processor machine you will NOT see any difference in performance. This
    > information applies to most, of not all of the software you will run on
    > your pc.
    >
    > However, if you are running MORE THEN one program on your PC, and THOSE
    > programs are using processing then you experience a benefit. So, a duel
    > core system can't make a single program run faster..but it can run two
    > programs at full speed.
    >
    >
    >
    > So, if you have one program running, and it is using full processing, and
    > then you launch some other program, then it can/will run on the OTHER
    > processor. So, more processors will not speed up a single program.
    > However, with more processors, then each program you LOAD can run on a
    > DIFFERENT processor. This means you don't get as much as a slow down when
    > running MORE THEN one program. (and, as mentioned, it means each separate
    > program can run on a different processor).
    >
    >
    >
    > 99% of the time in word, or excel, or ms-access, you are at some prompt,
    > and little, if any
    > processing is being used.
    >
    >
    >
    > In fact, for about the last 4 or more years (even before duel core
    > processing), ms-access would not speed up with more processing anyway.
    > Ms-access is NOT processing bound, but i/o bound (that means ms-access is
    > slow NOT due to processing, but slow due to waiting for the disk drive, or
    > the network. These are the big bottle necks, and when you upgrade your pc,
    > you are not really speeding up the disk drive, or the speed of your
    > network -- these are the major bottle necks, and they are not faster now
    > then they were 5 years ago).
    >
    >
    >
    > So, it has been a NUMBER of years that throwing more processing at a
    > ms-access will not help.
    >
    > So, to answer your question, no, ms-access does not take advantage of duel
    > processors. Nor does your favorite game, or even auto CAD. However, ALL
    > SOFTWARE will benefit from a duel core processors IF YOU ARE RUNNING more
    > then one program at the SAME TIME (and ALSO those other programs are max
    > processing load).
    >
    >
    >
    > If you are experience a slow down in ms-access, then check your setup,
    > the best list of things to check is here, and some of them often make a
    > SUBSTANTIAL difference.
    >
    >
    >
    > http://www.granite.ab.ca/access/performancefaq.htm
    > --
    > Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
    > Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    > pleaseNOOSpamKallal@msn.com
    > http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
    >
    >
     
  5. Charlie Hoffpauir

    Charlie Hoffpauir
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    On Thu, 20 Jul 2006 22:05:09 -0600, "Albert D.Kallal"
    <PleaseNOOOsPAMmkallal@msn.com> wrote:

    <snip>
    >Most desktop applications (at least all of the major ones) will NOT
    >experience a
    >speed up with duel core machines.
    >

    <snip>

    Although I do not have a dual core processor (nor dual processors),
    I've read comments for a few years that Photoshop "does" speed up when
    run on a dual processor machine. So it would appear that some desktop
    apps do make use of dual processor capabilities.

    Charlie Hoffpauir
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
    Message board:
    http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec?htx=board&r=rw&p=surnames.hoffpauir
    Mail list:
    http://lists.rootsweb.com/index/surname/h/hoffpauir.html
    DNA project:
    <http://www.familytreedna.com/(153dme45ewxtrs45rzxk5z2x)/public/Hoffpauir/index.aspx>
     
  6. Larry Linson

    Larry Linson
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    Guest

    "Charlie Hoffpauir" <invalid@invalid.com> wrote

    > Although I do not have a dual core processor (nor dual processors),
    > I've read comments for a few years that Photoshop "does" speed up when
    > run on a dual processor machine. So it would appear that some desktop
    > apps do make use of dual processor capabilities.


    Over time, more and more applications will be programmed to take advantage
    of multi-processor environments (of which dual-core is just a "special
    case"). Photoshop is a compute-intensive environment and it made a lot of
    sense for them to invest in this technology "early-on."

    Larry Linson
    Microsoft Access MVP
     
  7. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews
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    Guest

    "Bud Jay" <budjay@jcsm.com> wrote:

    >We suspect that Access 2003 only uses a single core of the two available for
    >whatever reason. Can anyone confirm this and point me to any way that the
    >Athlon dual core systems can use both cores in an Access 2003 environment?


    This behavior would make sense but I can't explicitly confirm it.

    One way of being able to use dual CPU systems better might be to use
    SQL Server/SQL Server Express/MSDE. I suspect it will use multiple
    CPUs. But I don't know if it would make a significant difference in
    a single user environment.

    Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     

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