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Aasaa Di Vaar To First Pauri: Āpīnĥai āp Sāji▫o / ਆਪੀਨ੍ਹ੍ਹੈ ਆਪੁ ਸਾਜਿਓ

Discussion in 'Aasaa Di Vaar' started by Ambarsaria, Mar 10, 2013.

  1. Ambarsaria

    Ambarsaria Canada
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    This is a first post in a series for us to review and share each of our own understanding of the bani of Aasaa di Vaar in Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji.

    ਸਤਿਨਾਮੁ ਕਰਤਾ ਪੁਰਖੁ ਨਿਰਭਉ ਨਿਰਵੈਰੁ ਅਕਾਲ ਮੂਰਤਿ ਅਜੂਨੀ ਸੈਭੰ ਗੁਰ ਪ੍ਰਸਾਦਿ

    Ik▫oaʼnkār saṯnām karṯā purakẖ nirbẖa▫o nirvair akāl mūraṯ ajūnī saibẖaʼn gur parsāḏ.

    God/creator is one and is known as the eternal being, is the creator of all, present everywhere, without fear, without animosity, is timeless, is not guided by life cycles, is a self creation and is realized through its own (God/creator) blessing.
    Following Guru Anagad Dev ji,
    Gur Nanak Dev ji as follows,
    The pauri that follows the above sloaks in the construct of this segment,
    ESSENCE: Guru Angad Dev ji state that all light of numerous suns and moons is of no use if life is devoid of creator’s shining within and we stay filled with deep darkness. Guru Nanak Dev ji also state that absence the knowing of, recognizing of the creator is of lands (life, mind, etc.) full of rotten seeds.

    Guru ji encourage us to recognize the creator’s light, recognize creator’s ways, recognize creator’s creation and blessings.

    In the pauri much praise for the creator of all creation, one such witnessing all creation, blessing all, the control behind all life beginnings and ending.

    I stand corrected and all errors are mine.

    Any thoughts and what you think.

    Sat Sri Akal.

    Some Notes:

    1. For a musical rendition of this collection you may wish to listen along starting around 2 minutes and 20 seconds and going to about 4 minutes and 8 seconds,

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=u-p4bmMJthA

    2. ਸ੍ਰੀ ਗੁਰੂ ਗ੍ਰੰਥ ਸਾਹਿਬ ਵਿੱਚ ਕਰਤਾਰ ਦੀ ਮਹਿਮਾ ਭਰੀ ਬਾਣੀ, ਜੋ ਪੌੜੀ ਛੰਦਾਂ ਨਾਲ ਸਲੋਕ ਮਿਲਾਕੇ ਲਿਖੀ ਗਈ ਹੈ/Revered style written Gurbani where the sloaks are topped with a pauri.

    3. This series of posts will follow segments arranged sequentially in this order of combinations.

    4. The Punjabi discourse is of Prof. Sahib Singh ji.
    <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" LatentStyleCount="156"> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} </style> <![endif]-->
     
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  3. findingmyway

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    Asa Di Vaar is my favourite Bani as it is so incredibly instructive. Some sections are almost like a slap in the face to get your life in order! This is a good start and I look forward to the rest :kaurkhalsaflagred:
     
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  4. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    This Bani is one of the "Most read/MOST HEARD" category...yet "least followed/understood" category also. Its the Bani that embodies the entire 'life experiences" of Guru nanak ji sahib..written towards the end of His travels when He had settled down in kartarpur. It tears to shreds all rituals, fake beliefs, practices, pakhands etc which were rampant among the populace at that time...Guru Ji throws GYAAN on almost all subjects dear to the people...alas..SIKHS made "reading" Asa dee vaar into a RITUAL !!!...to be read..heard at .."Jet speed"..and glossed over...as done and completed in 45 minutes..or 90 minutes..or even half done..rare done..etc..if time is short..
    Veer Ambarsariah Ji has done us all a big favour...by placing this delicious dish before us on a silver platter...lets enjoy the feast of Gyaan:welcomemunda:
     
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  5. SaintSoldier1699

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    Asa di vaar is a favourite of mine, and like findingmyway said definately that slap/wake up call you need to kick start your day off!

    Its a shame all Gurdwara's only read this in the very early hours and its forgotten for the rest of the day.

    I was watching a lecture on Asa Di Vaar...
    Lecture on "Asa Ki Var" by Dr. Inderjeet Singh - Part One - YouTube

    and Dr Inderjeet Singh was saying no one really sings Asa Di Vaar in a true vaar style. To command this style would be similar to how a dhadhi sings vaars?

    What is everyones thoughts on this? And has anyone come across any recordings of Asa Di Vaar sung like this?
     
  6. spnadmin

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    Asa de Vaar was intended to be sung in the folk style, "Tunde Asraje Ki Dhuni," in the manner of the folk tune. The hymn begins with that instruction.

    vaar salokaa naal salok bhee mahlay pahilay kay likhay tunday as raajai kee Dhunee.
    Vaar With Shaloks, And Shaloks Written By The First Mehl. To Be Sung To The Tune Of 'Tunda-Asraajaa':

    I hope I understood your question.
     
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  7. Ambarsaria

    Ambarsaria Canada
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    spnadmin ji thanks for your post.
    <!--[if !mso]> <style> v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} </style> <![endif]--> Quite interesting point you raise.

    However I think the following may be more correct at least based on my very limited knowledge,

    The sloaks are in “Raag AaSaa”. There is no variation or deviation required of that Raag for the sloaks.

    The Pauri’s at the end of each collection of saloks is what requires to be sung in “Tunde Asraj di Dhuni”/”in the melody style of Tunde Asraj”

    Let us review an example taken from Sikhwiki,

    A writing in “Tundey Asraj” style of rendition,

    [​IMG]

    What happens in the above is the following,

    • It is depiction of topic in review
      • Valor

    • It is a depiction of the successful outcome of such valor

    So in “Aasaa di Vaar” Guru ji slap us in the Sloaks leading up to a pauri. A wonderful characterization (slap us) by findingmyway ji earlier in this thread. In the Pauri it is “Vaar”/ ਵਾਰ. The context of Vaar being the following,
    • A followup to issues identified and clarified by Guru ji in the preceding sloaks

    • A learning through “Vaar”/ਵਾਰ or as to its meaning the praise. Praise being of the creator and all of creator’s qualities and creation.
    So hence when you hear renditions of Aasaa di Vaar by most Raagi Singhs you will hear Raag Aasaa for the sloaks followed by pauri sung in the “Tunde Asraj di Dhuni”/”in the melody style of Tunde Asraj”.

    <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:punctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:UseFELayout/> </w:Compatibility> <w:DoNotOptimizeForBrowser/> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--> First Pauri
    3 minutes and 20 seconds


    Second Pauri
    6 minutes and 32 seconds
    <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" LatentStyleCount="156"> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} </style> <![endif]-->
    Asa Di Vaar Shiromani Ragi Bhai Balbir Singh Ji - Rare Recording 1991 - YouTube


    I stand corrected.


    Sat Sri Akal.
    <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:punctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:UseFELayout/> </w:Compatibility> <w:DoNotOptimizeForBrowser/> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" LatentStyleCount="156"> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} </style> <![endif]-->
     
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    #6 Ambarsaria, Mar 15, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013
  8. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    have a Look at this Thread on SPN....its about Basant Ki vaar..and MOST renditions on You tube by various Kirtaniyahs DONT do justice to its "VAAR" title...but concentrate on BASANT RAAG....a "VAAR" is an ODE and its singing STYLE has to be as per its title and sung in DHADEE STYLE with the appropriate instruments...a vaar is hardly suited to harmonoium/tabla ?? Just some thoughts...

    http://www.sikhphilosophy.net/gurmat-sangeet/25099-basant-ki-vaar.html#.UUMqxMpvCKU
     
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  9. spnadmin

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    Are you saying that part is raag aasaa and part is Tunde? Or are you saying it is all Tunde?

    I am not a musically talented person. But after listening to raag Aasaa (not to post because I don't want to go off topic) I don't hear it.


    Then you said you stand corrected. And now I stand confused. Please explain.

    :whatzpointkudi:

    p/s lol Gyani ji just explained it behind the scenes. And as per usual he has put a twist on things that has me me laughing my head off.
     
    #8 spnadmin, Mar 15, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013
  10. Ambarsaria

    Ambarsaria Canada
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    spnadmin ji thanks for your post. I think that there indeed are two parts from rendition perspective. A "Raag" part and the Pauris as "Tunde Asraj ki Dhuni". I do not believe that one can do the tempo of the "Tunde Asraj ki Dhuni" and inject it into the Aasaa Raag. I have listened to Aasaa di Vaar in fast tempo done by Raagis, but I believe it takes away the reflective part of the sloaks which is critical to launching the Pauri with vigor. Just my observation but I am no scholar of this and neither would I be a stickler.

    I also wonder if Dhadi Singhs were around the time of the Guru ji's 1st to 5th for this to be linked to their style? Perhaps someone can bring out historical references to "Tunde Asraja ki Dhuni" in terms of musical instruments associated with him.

    I believe it can fit the Kavishri jathas lot more which is just verbal renditions per the underlying musical guidance.

    Wonderful Gurbani and gift of Guru jis regardless.

    Sat Sri Akal.
     
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  11. spnadmin

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    Ambarsaria ji

    Yes.. unless the story was all hatched up. My understanding has been for some time that the choice of Tunde was quite deliberate. There is a lot on the Internet about the story of King Asa behind Tunde Asraje ki Dhunne. Poets put the story of King Asa to music; the folk tunes allegedly inspired Guru Arjan Dev."Guru Arjan found a great resemblance between the five-lined pauris of Guru Nanak's Asa-di-var and the var of Tunda-Asaraja and prescribed the tune of the latter for the singing of the former. "

    Sikiwiki has a good account of Tunde, http://www.sikhiwiki.org/index.php/Tunda_Asraja
    giving 3 different versions to explain it all: Pundit Narayan Singh, Professor Sahib Singh, and an un-named 3rd version.

    For musical instruments of the time, we can be sure the harmonium did not become part of the music of North India until the 19th Century, introduced by Austrian missionaries at that time.

    Probable instruments used by the dhadi for folk tunes and ballads were Rebab, Sarangi and Dhad. information in the Sikh Encyclopedia/musicology section. http://www.thesikhencyclopedia.com/arts-and-heritage/musicology-and-musicians/dhadi[/url]

    "Guru Nanak Dev renovated the Arab/Iranian string instrument REBAB ...There are 22 Vars in the scriptures to be sung on the specific tunes by the 'Rebabis'. For example the Asa Di Var is to be sung in Raag Bhairvi on 'Tunde Asraje ki Dhuni' (ref: 'Guru Arjan Dev, Prophet & Poet' by H.L.Agnihotri). http://www.sikh-heritage.co.uk/arts/rebabiMardana/RebabiMardana.htm
     
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  12. spnadmin

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  13. Serjinder Singh

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    A ‘vaar is a folk singing style that was sung by ‘Dhadis’ using basically ‘Dhud’, a small hand-held drum played using fingers of one hand hitting the side of the drum while the other hand works on a chord wrapped around the tightening strings of the drum to modulate the pitch and tone of the sound of each stroke. The singers are called Dhadis because their basic instrument is the Dhud drum. The other important instrument that is invariably employed to accompany is ‘Sarangi’. The composition that is sung consists of ‘Pauris’. A vaar is always fundamentally a collections of ‘Pauris’ to be sung. Apart from the 22 Vaars in Sri Guru Granth Sahib, one for each raag, even Japuji Sahib is also a Vaar. In old times the Japuji was also called ‘Nirankar di Vaar’.
    In between the singing of pauris, the Dhadis verbally recite saloks that are not sung in any raag but simply recited generally as introduction or commentary, or some other objective. But saloks are not to be sung. That is why we don’t see Freed’s salok given any Raag indication. Same is the case with the Bhog Saloks of ninth Guru ji. Similarly, there is no Raag indication for the group of saloks near the end known as ‘Salok Vaaraan te Vadheek’ (meaning those saloks that could not be added to the pauris of the 22 Vaars and hence are ‘Vadheek’ or ‘additional to’ the vaars.
    <?"urn::eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p> </o:p>
    Except for Asa Di Vaar, where first Guruji himself designated his own and second Guru ji’s saloks for each of the 24 pauris, for other Vaars it was fifth Guru ji at the time of the compilation of SGGS that the Saloks were attached to each pauri. Even so, there were many saloks, composed by all the first five Gurujis that remained and were placed in the section ‘Salok Vaaraan te Vadheek’ near the end of SGGS.
    It may be noted that Chhakka’s were attached to the Pauris in Asa Di Vaar at a later stage. Originally, like the rest of the 21 Vaars there were only Pauris and Saloks. It was the singers at some later stage that Chhakkas were attached to the Saloks and Pauris when the first Panj Granthi was brought into existence for the convenience of the Sikhs for Nitenm, Keertan, or ready reference purposes. In SGGS we see the Chhakkas in the appropriate place in the Chhant part of the Raag Asa for fourth Guru ji’s bani.
    Originally, singers used to sing only the pauris in Dhadi style while the saloks were recited without singing. In fact this is the folk style even today where in between the singing the leader of the Dhadi Jatha relates events or gives comments just as the Saloks serve similar purposes. The designation of the vaar style such as ‘Tundey Us Raje Ki Dhuni’ for each Vaar was done at the suggestion of sixth Guru ji for each Vaar and these Dhunis or tune names were added in the SGGS manuscript at a later stage.
    Now, the question of the Raag for each Vaar and how does it fit in with singing Pauris that is folk style. I strongly believe that it is not only the classical style of Indian music that uses the discipline of classical raags. The folk tunes such as Vaar can also adopt a raag easily. In fact it is much easier in the case of a folk tune.
    The discipline of each classical Raag depends mainly on the identity of notes employed out of seven notes Sa, Re, Gaa, Maa, Paa, Dhaa, and Nee (none or some of these may be prohibited for a particular Raag). The other part of the Raag discipline depends on the rule as to which of the allowed notes are to be used while moving towards higher pitch and which ones while coming back towards the lower pitch end. The longer the sentence of the song to be sung, the more complicated and difficult the Raag redention of the singing becomes. However, the folk tunes use very few of the notes, may be four or five and the variations and complications are few. Hence, singing in folk style using the prescribed notes of a Raag is much easier and effective at higher pitched notes often the Vaar is sung in. The point is that it is wrong to assume that a Indian classical raag cannot be employed to sing a folk composition. I can sing a pauri in the Dhadi style using either Raag Asa, Todi, or other quite comfortably and effectively using a sarangi, a violin, or harmonium for that matter.
    Humbly
    Serjinder Singh
     
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    #12 Serjinder Singh, Mar 17, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 10, 2015
  14. spnadmin

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    You can read the full article, The Rebab Tradition at this link: http://www.sikh-heritage.co.uk/arts/rebabiMardana/RebabiMardana.htm


    Bhai Kahn Singh Nabha, writes in his 'Mahan Kosh', that the Rebab was previously known as "Narad Veena" or "Ravan Veena". It is the favourite instrument of the sage Narad and Goddess Saraswati. Although this instrument may have divine background, but Guru Nanak and the Sufi Fakirs have brought this instrument down to the level of the general public. For Guru Nanak the divine singer with this divine instrument was Bhai Mardana. Bhai Mardana was the first person from his childhood who started playing the divine gurbani music with the Rebab, and accompanied Guru Nanak on all his travels with earnest devotion.

    Guru Nanak Dev renovated the Arab/Iranian string instrument REBAB and activated his friend Bhai Mardana to master it and sing the hymns of divine grace. That is how the celebrated 'Rebabi' Tradition came into being. There are 22 Vars in the scriptures to be sung on the specific tunes by the 'Rebabis'. For example the Asa Di Var is to be sung in Raag Bhairvi on 'Tunde Asraje ki Dhuni' (ref: 'Guru Arjan Dev, Prophet & Poet' by H.L.Agnihotri).

    During the times of the 6th Master the Rebab music was supplemented by 'Dhadi' singing of chivalrous Vars while Guru Gobind Singh combined the folk of Dhadi and Classical tradition of Rebabi and patronised a new school of Sikh Holy Music.

    In Sri Anandpur Sahib's town planning a 'Muhalla of Rababis' came into being. Bhai Nand Lal Goya (The great Persian poet and musician) was the head of this school. A famous Rebabi DAULAT ALI was there to assist him.

    The Master sent Bhai Nand Lal Goya and all the Rebabis to Multan to establish a Rebabi School over there. After that the city of Anandpur Sahib was besieged and destroyed. It is said that Daulat Ali, known as DAULTI Rebabi continued reciting the Sikh Holy Music.(Article courtesy Sikh Heritage Museum U.K. ref: Iqbal Namah (Persian) by Raja Ram Tota of Kashmir, the Royal scribe of Sher-e-Punjab Maharaja Ranjit Singh).
     
  15. Gyani Jarnail Singh

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    1.
    In every Vaar with "Pauris"..the TITLE PAUREE is given...there is NONE in japji !!

    2. Japji is by a number of Gurus sahibs...Mostly by Guru nanak Ji...One Slok by Guru Arjun Ji..another slok by Guru Angad Ji..one last verse also by Guru Angad Ji...REST by Guru nanak ji..

    Just info purposes...
     
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  16. Arvind

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    Respected Gyani Ji,

    Your second point caught my attention, so looking for more information about it please.

    Somehow I was under impression that, Japji Sahib has bani of Guru Nanak Dev Ji (from Ikoankaar Satnam upto Nanak Nadree Nadar Nihal) and then last salok is by Guru Angad Dev Ji.

    The first salok (Aad Sach upto Nanak Hosi Bhee Sach)... are you referring that to be by Guru Arjan Dev Ji, and not by Guru Nanak Dev Ji? sukhmani Sahib has similar salok with a slight variation (Bhee replaced by Bhi) said to be by Baba Sri Chand ji. Not sure about its authenticity though.

    Kindly clarify with references.

    With Regards, Arvind.
     
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  17. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    This is taken from..
    AAD GRANTH- Referencing Gurbani PDF - Dr Devinder Singh Chahal available at IUS canda .
    see attached pdf jios.
     
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  18. Arvind

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    Thank you Gyani Ji :)

    Dr. Chahal has not given any reference to support that 'Aad Sach upto Nanak Hosi Bhee Sach' is written by Guru Arjan Dev Ji.

    So my question still stands there... Who wrote first salok of japji Sahib? I still take Guru Nanak Dev Ji wrote it, unless there is a historical reference that refutes it. That s what I am looking for.

    Moreover, though Dr. Chahal has done commendable work proposing the referencing of Guru Granth Sahib Ji, I really don't agree with many of his points, which are already there in the reviewers' comments section.

    With Regards,
    Arvind.
     
  19. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Arvind Ji...

    Perhaps food for thought...

    1. The Slok aad sach is in sukhmani sahib with the Authorship established...in japji sahib Guru nanak jis authorship is NOT established..just accepted as tradition...there is no mehla 1

    2. The second Slok is also established under authorship of GURU Angad elsewhere in SGGS as Slok mh 2...

    The MOOLmantar (manglacharan) and japji could be by various Gurus sahibs..ITS essentially the NICHORR of SGGS.....so various Guru sahibs could be JOINTLY responsible for this Bani Japji.....maybe thats why its authorship is NOT under Mehla 1....as for example Asa Ki vaar is !!..and its made CLEAR that ALL the SLOKS are also by Mehlla Pehlla !! DOUBLE SURETY being given on authorship...which wasnt really "necessary" if we come to think of it...as Meh 1 is already there in the title...

    Just some random thoughts...no disrespect ...
    Regards
     
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  20. Gyani Jarnail Singh

    Gyani Jarnail Singh Malaysia
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    Sawa lakh se EK larraoan
    Mentor Writer SPNer Contributor

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    I apologise for sidetracking jios...perhaps we should go back to ASA KI VAAR...and maybe open another thread on this if necessary. Apologies .:faujasingh:
     
  21. inder preet

    inder preet
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    Sasriakal ji please do help me to tell that how.can we post videos and katha from you tube as u have posted this lecture how can we do that and is there any link for asa di vaar baani.
     

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