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A question my elders cannot answer

Discussion in 'Sikh Sikhi Sikhism' started by jasminsandhu, Jun 28, 2010.

  1. jasminsandhu

    jasminsandhu
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    I noticed that people who wear a kirpan always have it hanging on the left side. When i asked my family, they didn't have an answer and just said thats the right side to have it and it had never been questioned. So i'm just wondering if there is a specific reason for this? and if it would be totally wrong if it was on the other side? if there isn't a reason then i shall just leave this unanswered. I hope someone can enlighten me on this, thank you! :feedback: ikonkaar
     
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  3. spnadmin

    spnadmin United States
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    Jasminsandhu ji

    The Sikh Rehat Maryada does not say how long a kirpan should be or how it should be worn, only that a practicing Sikh should wear a kirpan as part of the 5 kakkars. So your elders were wise not to make up an explanation based on hear-say. welcomekaur

    I did a little searching and could not find the answer for you. My own inclination is like your elders : not to invent.

    Maybe another forum member will be able to answer from the perspective of history. Good luck.
     
  4. ManinderSingh69

    ManinderSingh69
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    Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh !!

    Simple reason i feel is, if a situation arises where u need to use The Kirpan, being righty, u will use ur right hand to pull out The Kirpan. Having Kirpan on left side would make it easy to take it out than being on right side for a righty. Bhull Chukk di Khima

    Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa ||
    Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh ||
     
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  5. spnadmin

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    I had the same suspicion ... that there was a practical reason. Just wondering though whether there may be some tradition behind it. I have never heard one. But the question never came up before either. With kara my understanding is that it is worn on the favored hand.So if you are right-handed you wear it on your right hand, and if left-handed, on the left hand. But again that is not mentioned either in the SRM. All of this is fascinating.
     
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  6. jasminsandhu

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    thank you for the replys, I guess there is just a practical reason and not some tradition behind it. Thanks for the information about the kara as well narayanjot kaur ji I never knew it was a preference just thought it was always supposed to be on the right hand side, thanks very much! :thumbsuppp: ikonkaar
     
  7. BhagatSingh

    BhagatSingh Canada
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    Remember, with a real talwar, you can strike an opponent as you draw the sword. So you want the kirpan in a position that gives you the maximum power and speed as you draw...

    of course, with 3-6 inch kirpans it doesn't matter where you have it on your person. You could technically wear that as a "necklace" or strap it horizontally along your belt, as many Sikh children I have seen, do.
     
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