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ਜਉ ਤੁਮ ਗਿਰਿਵਰ ਤਉ ਹਮ ਮੋਰਾ ॥ jo thum girivar tho ham moraa || If You are the mountain, Lord, then I am the peacock. In Sikhi, the peacock symbolizes the soul's craving for the Lord. In Shinto peacocks symbolize compassion. I found this on the web, related to the Buddhist tradition: "The association of this jewel-tone bird with its sun-like fan of a tail evocative of the Wheel of Dharma -- the Buddha's teachings, its connection to the ideas of immortality and compassion, and the unification of views or opposites, as well as the correspondence with the Garden which is the Pure Land, demonstrate in Mahayana Buddhism the archetypical nature of the relationship between the peacock and Amitabha. 'In the depiction of this Buddha of Eternal Light, he is seated under a tree; we see its flowers and leaves peeking through the pavilion. Tenga Rinpoche says, " . . . birds, in particular, have strong desire and craving, so, as a symbol of craving transformed into discriminating wisdom, Amitabha's throne is supported by peacocks." 'There are actually eight peacocks that support his throne, one at each corner of the base. They stand for the idea that no matter the misdeeds committed during one's lifetime[s], rebirth is possible in Sukhavati, the Pure Land of Great Bliss that is the Western Paradise of Opameh [Tibetan for Amitabha]. Any and all evil-doing is eventually absorbed."

ਜਉ ਤੁਮ ਗਿਰਿਵਰ ਤਉ ਹਮ ਮੋਰਾ ॥
jo thum girivar tho ham moraa ||
If You are the mountain, Lord, then I am the peacock.

In Sikhi, the peacock symbolizes the soul's craving for the Lord. In Shinto peacocks symbolize compassion. I found this on the web, related to the Buddhist tradition:

"The association of this jewel-tone bird with its sun-like fan of a tail evocative of the Wheel of Dharma -- the Buddha's teachings, its connection to the ideas of immortality and compassion, and the unification of views or opposites, as well as the correspondence with the Garden which is the Pure Land, demonstrate in Mahayana Buddhism the archetypical nature of the relationship between the peacock and Amitabha.

'In the depiction of this Buddha of Eternal Light, he is seated under a tree; we see its flowers and leaves peeking through the pavilion.  Tenga Rinpoche says, " . . . birds, in particular, have strong desire and craving, so, as a symbol of craving transformed into discriminating wisdom, Amitabha's throne is supported by peacocks."
 
'There are actually eight peacocks that support his throne, one at each corner of the base.  They stand for the idea that no matter the misdeeds committed during one's lifetime[s], rebirth is possible in Sukhavati, the Pure Land of Great Bliss that is the Western Paradise of Opameh [Tibetan for Amitabha].  Any and all evil-doing is eventually absorbed."
spnadmin, May 13, 2008
    • dalsingh
      Antonia ji,

      I love your work here. I have increased my understanding so much as a result of it. Thank you.
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