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dalsingh

Between a rock and a hard place. People in India had been protesting against British rule for some time before WW2. German's took advantage of this and some Sikhs (usually but not exclusively ex war prisoners) fought against the British side. Here is an image of one such person in a German uniform. Before we judge I think we need to consider the context of those times. The policy of "an enemy of an enemy is a friend of mine" is one commonly used, even by those, perceived to be advanced, western societies today. You can be pretty sure Sikhs were totally unaware of the heinous crimes that were taking place against the Jewish communities of Europe under Hitler. I imagine it was simply a case of fighting an occupying force for many such people. I think incidents like the Jallianwallah Bagh massacre at Amritsar did not help endear the British overlords to many Sikhs.

Between a rock and a hard place.

People in India had been protesting against British rule for some time before WW2. German's took advantage of this and some Sikhs (usually but not exclusively ex war prisoners) fought against the British side. Here is an image of one such person in a German uniform.

Before we judge I think we need to consider the context of those times. The policy of "an enemy of an enemy is a friend of mine" is one commonly used, even by those, perceived to be advanced, western societies today. You can be pretty sure Sikhs were totally unaware of the heinous crimes that were taking place against the Jewish communities of Europe under Hitler. I imagine it was simply a case of fighting an occupying force for many such people.

I think incidents like the Jallianwallah Bagh massacre at Amritsar did not help endear the British overlords to many Sikhs.
dalsingh, Aug 20, 2008